All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Monday, January 14, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • Obama Warns Of Dangerous Consequences If Debt Limit Isn't Raised
    President Obama gave the last news conference of his first term on Monday. The president said Congress must break the habit of negotiating its way through crisis over and over again.
  • Gun Background Check System Lacks Money, State Involvement
    The national dialogue on gun control has focused attention on the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS). Federally-licensed gun dealers in all states are required to run a check through the system on any customer looking to purchase a gun. Critics, though, see a flaw in the program. While all states are asked to contribute information to the system — on their convicted criminals, drug abusers, mentally ill — they are not required to. Audie Cornish speaks with Steve Buford, an administrator for the NICS program in California, which is one of the leading state contributors to the database.
  • Homeless Seek Shelter, Crops Suffer Amid Southwest Cold Snap
    With consecutive days of subfreezing temperatures, homeless shelters say they're short on supplies and their budgets are stretched. Meanwhile, farmers are working to fight freezing temperatures that could affect the size and quality of this year's crops.
  • 47 States Report Widespread Influenza Outbreaks
    Forty-seven states now have widespread outbreaks of the influenza virus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We look at the Philadelphia area, where health officials say flu season arrived early this year.
  • Women With A Berry-Snacking Habit May Have Healthier Hearts
    Love berries? It seems a habit of eating them three times a week may stave off heart attacks, at least in middle-aged women, according to a new study. That's because of compounds called anthocyanins found in these brightly colored gems.
  • 'Segregation Forever': A Fiery Pledge Forgiven, But Not Forgotten
    On Jan. 14, 1963, Alabama Gov. George Wallace delivered an inauguration speech destined to go down in the history books. That now infamous line, "segregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever," embodied a moment in U.S. history that changed the political landscape forever.
  • Demand High At San Francisco Firearms Show As Nation Mulls Gun Control
    Concerns about new gun control measures has many weapons flying off the shelves. At one recent gun show in San Francisco, assault rifles were in short supply even though their prices had skyrocketed.
  • In 'Barbara,' A New Look At Life Behind The Wall
    Already an awards-season staple, German historical dramas are moving beyond the horrors of the Third Reich and delving into the nuanced past of the former East Germany. Films like Christian Petzold's Barbara, a quiet story about a troubled young doctor, tell a different kind of history.
  • Quiet No More, Suggestions For Hybrid Car Sounds Include Skateboards, Toddlers
    Audie Cornish shares listener suggestions for the sound a quiet hybrid car might make to warn visually impaired people of their approach. The most popular was the sound of the car from The Jetsons cartoon of the 1960s.
  • Despite French Air Strikes, Islamic Militants Seize More Territory In Mali
    A town in central Mali has been taken over by Islamist insurgents, after France intervened to prevent further advancement by local rebels. Audie Cornish speaks with Adam Nossiter, West and Central African bureau chief for The New York Times.

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