All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Monday, January 11, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • DancingKaren celebrate Year 2749, and a decade in Minnesota
    The Karen people didn't just mark the start of a new year last week. It's been 10 years since the first of them escaped the oppressive regime that rules Myanmar, and the Karen begin to immigrate to the Twin Cities.3:49 p.m.
  • Cadmium jewelryU.S. consumer chief warns Asian firms on cadmium use
    The top U.S. consumer product regulator is warning Asian manufacturers not to substitute other toxic substances for lead in children's items, a message that follows the launch of a government investigation into Chinese-made jewelry that lab tests showed was laden with the heavy metal cadmium.3:54 p.m.
  • H1N1 vaccineHealth department aims to get more vaccinated for H1N1
    Epidemiologist Kris Ehresmann of the Minnesota Department of Health talks about "Ban the Bug," a campaign created in order to get people vaccinated for the H1N1 flu.5:20 p.m.
  • Cadmium jewelryU.S. consumer chief warns Asian firms on cadmium use
    The top U.S. consumer product regulator is warning Asian manufacturers not to substitute other toxic substances for lead in children's items, a message that follows the launch of a government investigation into Chinese-made jewelry that lab tests showed was laden with the heavy metal cadmium.5:50 p.m.
  • DancingKaren celebrate Year 2749, and a decade in Minnesota
    The Karen people didn't just mark the start of a new year last week. It's been 10 years since the first of them escaped the oppressive regime that rules Myanmar, and the Karen begin to immigrate to the Twin Cities.5:53 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • As Detroit Auto Show Opens, Bailout Funds Examined
    The Detroit Auto Show opens this week, and today, reporters got a preview of what's coming to showrooms later this year. Joining the journalists are members of Congress, who are there to see how General Motors and Chrysler are spending tens of billions of dollars in taxpayer money. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Frank Langfitt.
  • AP: Road Projects Haven't Helped Employment
    President Obama's $787 billion stimulus plan was intended to help the economy through tax cuts and job creation. One particular area of job creation was construction jobs to repair roads and bridges. But a new report from The Associated Press shows that spending in those areas has had no effect on local unemployment. AP investigative reporter Matt Apuzzo talks to Melissa Block about the report.
  • Workers With Best, Worst Jobs Compare Notes
    CareerCast compiled a list of the 200 best and worst jobs of 2010 based on environment, income, employment outlook, physical demands and stress. The best job of actuary pays well and sounds like interesting enough work; but the worst job on the list — roustabout — at least has a nice ring to it, although the pay is poor. Karen DeToro is an actuary, and Adam Henry works offshore as a roustabout. They chat about the merits of their own jobs.
  • Inside The Genius, But Asocial Elevator's Brain
    Last week, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai took the title for the world's tallest building. Visitors to the observation deck ascended 124 floors in less than a minute, breaking records for speed. Most remarkable, however, was what passengers neither felt or saw: an ultra-high-tech elevator brain able to predict human behavior with eerie precision.
  • A Tribute To The Laser, 50 Years On
    All Tech Considered marks 2010 with a tribute — from musician and writer David Was — to the laser, which turns 50 years old this year. Was checks out new laser gadgets at this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
  • CQ: 2009 Was The Most Partisan Year Ever
    Every year, Congressional Quarterly measures the percentage of partisan votes taken in the House and Senate. A roll call vote is considered partisan if a majority of Democrats vote against a majority of Republicans. But in the Senate last year, it was a whopping 72 percent — the highest percentage of partisan votes ever tallied in that chamber.
  • How Will Connecticut Fare Without Dodd?
    It was an emotional moment when Chris Dodd, the longest-serving senator in Connecticut history, bowed out of a re-election bid. In the past he had no trouble winning. But this year he was, by all accounts, in serious trouble. But in bowing out — and with the emergence of a very popular Democrat in the race — Democrats may come out of this better off than they were.
  • Sex, Money Scandal Hits N. Ireland Leader
    A top leader of Northern Ireland announced today that he's taking a six-week hiatus, following a sex and money scandal involving his wife — a politician in her own right — and a much younger lover. NPR's Melissa Block gets the back story from Mark Devenport, BBC Northern Ireland's political editor.
  • Vampire Weekend: Beyond The Blogs
    The group's emergence coincided with a bunch of trends: rock bands influenced by world music, rock bands that dress like preppies and pop-culture phenomena connected in some way to vampires. On Contra, they do more or less the same, with a couple of surprises.
  • Filmmaker Eric Rohmer Dies At 89
    Filmmaker Eric Rohmer died today in Paris at the age of 89, according to his production company. Though he was often associated with the French New Wave, Rohmer was older than Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard. His films seemed to be more influenced by such older French filmmakers as Renoir and Bresson. Yet by focusing each of his "moral tales" (including Claire's Knee, My Night at Maud's and Chloe in the Afternoon) on the interior moral dilemma of his central character, he made his movies more like literature. And that was revolutionary in its own way.

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