All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Thursday, December 31, 2009

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Ski trip in 1998Family finds strength after New Year's skiing accident
    For the Fink family, each New Year's Day marks another anniversary of an event that profoundly changed the family's life. Eleven years ago, Susan Fink fell on a ski trail and was paralyzed from the neck down.4:14 p.m.
  • Art HoundsArt Hounds
    Each week Minnesota Public Radio News asks three people from the Minnesota arts scene to be "Art Hounds." Their job is to step outside their own work and hunt down something exciting that's going on in local arts.4:44 p.m.
  • Former U.S. Senator Mark DaytonThe stigmas of depression
    All Things Considered medical analyst talks about the stigmas around depression, an often intensely personal disease.4:49 p.m.
  • Irvin MayfieldMinn. Orch's jazz director still calls New Orleans home
    Minneapolis revelers looking to add some New Orleans spice to an otherwise chilly New Years Eve will likely head to the Dakota jazz club tonight, where trumpeter Irvin Mayfield is performing with his quintet, part of a national New Year's Eve concert broadcast.4:54 p.m.
  • Pawlenty to appealPawlenty to appeal ruling
    Gov. Tim Pawlenty says he will appeal a judge's ruling that he overstepped his authority by unilaterally cutting the budget last spring.5:20 p.m.
  • Boarding the NorthstarMnDOT releases $9 billion rail plan
    The Minnesota Department of Transportation has just released its first ever comprehensive state rail plan, plotting out as much as $9 billion in new investments in freight and passenger infrastructure through 2030.5:24 p.m.
  • Ski trip in 1998Family finds strength after New Year's skiing accident
    For the Fink family, each New Year's Day marks another anniversary of an event that profoundly changed the family's life. Eleven years ago, Susan Fink fell on a ski trail and was paralyzed from the neck down.6:14 p.m.
  • Irvin MayfieldMinn. Orch's jazz director still calls New Orleans home
    Minneapolis revelers looking to add some New Orleans spice to an otherwise chilly New Years Eve will likely head to the Dakota jazz club tonight, where trumpeter Irvin Mayfield is performing with his quintet, part of a national New Year's Eve concert broadcast.6:25 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Ex-Guantanamo Inmates Among Detroit Plot Planners
    Four members of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, the group that claimed responsibility for the attempted Christmas Day airliner attack, were previously detainees at the U.S. prison camp at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Although most Guantanamo detainees have returned to their old lives, several have rejoined the battlefield.
  • Saudi Detainee-Rehab Program Mostly Successful
    Saudi Arabia's rehabilitation program for former detainees at Guantanamo Bay includes religious dialogue and relies heavily on families of the former detainees. Christopher Boucek, an associate in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, says that to date, the program has had a success rate of about 80 percent.
  • Past Decade A Roller Coaster Ride On Wall Street
    War, recession and a speculative bubble burst made the decade tumultuous for investors.
  • 'An Education' Writer Praises Film Of Memoir
    British columnist Lynn Barber's memoir, An Education, is about her affair, while she was still in high school, with an older con man. She spent weekdays prepping for Oxford and weekends flying off to European cities with her lover. Barber, who was happy with the movie adaptation of the memoir, says by the time she saw the film it no longer felt like her story.
  • Tale Of Two Cities Illustrates Battle For Israel's Soul
    As the world focuses on the conflict between the Israelis and the Palestinians, a divide is growing within Israel. Religious and secular Jews are increasingly at odds, and nowhere is the split more obvious than in Israel's two main cities, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem.
  • Charlie Sheen Arrest Draws Little Public Scrutiny
    It has all the makings of the next big celebrity scandal, but the arrest of television actor Charlie Sheen on Christmas Day for domestic violence may not be met with the usual media hubbub. The reasons, says commentator Andrew Wallenstein: First, we've come to expect this from him; second, Sheen not only is a dirtbag, he plays one on TV.
  • The Year In Apologies
    Whatever 2009 will be remembered for, the year reigned supreme when it came to apologies. Among the apologetic: singer Kanye West, South Carolina Rep. Joe Wilson, Sen. John Ensign and golfer Tiger Woods. Other notorious apologies include ones from South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford, tennis champ Serena Williams and talk show host David Letterman.
  • The Loudness Wars: Why Music Sounds Worse
    In the past decade, recorded music has gotten louder — and has deteriorated from a sound-quality standpoint. A recording engineer discusses "the loudness wars," and a psychology professor explains why the ubiquity of MP3s has changed what we hear.
  • CIA Suffers Worst Attack In Afghan War
    The suicide bomb attack Wednesday on the CIA forward base killed at least eight Americans, including the base's chief. It was the worst the agency has suffered in the Afghanistan war.
  • Military Deaths In Afghanistan Spike
    Twice as many U.S. troops were killed this year than last in Afghanistan. Improvised-explosive devices were by far the biggest culprit, up to 7,300 attacks in the past year. Senior U.S. military officials expect things will be far worse next year, because the Taliban is getting stronger.

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