All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, December 29, 2009

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • New Year's birthdaysJan. 1 a common birth date for many immigrants
    With New Year's Day just around the corner, you can be sure that people will make a fuss over any New Year's babies born that day. But it turns out there are far more people with a Jan. 1 birth date than you might think.3:49 p.m.
  • Playing the carillonMayo's unique carillon rings over Rochester
    The Rochester carillon is one of the largest in the country and one of only three in Minnesota. The musical instrument consists of 56 bronze bells housed in a tower.3:53 p.m.
  • New Year's birthdaysJan. 1 a common birth date for many immigrants
    With New Year's Day just around the corner, you can be sure that people will make a fuss over any New Year's babies born that day. But it turns out there are far more people with a Jan. 1 birth date than you might think.5:50 p.m.
  • Playing the carillonMayo's unique carillon rings over Rochester
    The Rochester carillon is one of the largest in the country and one of only three in Minnesota. The musical instrument consists of 56 bronze bells housed in a tower.5:54 p.m.
  • Memorable stories of 2009
    Over the course of a year, Minnesota Public Radio's reporters, producers and hosts talk to hundreds of people from all walks of life. Some make a bigger impression than others. Some stories involve a behind-the-scenes challenge. MPR journalists each selected a story or show that was the most memorable to them.6:15 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • U.S. Has Long Kept Watchful Eye On Yemen
    The attempted bombing of a Northwest Airlines flight on Christmas Day has thrown a spotlight on the nation of Yemen, after an al-Qaida group that's based there claimed responsibility for the foiled attack. But the United States had already been ramping up its operations in Yemen to counter the al-Qaida threat there.
  • Chertoff Seeks Full-Body Scanners At Airports
    Former Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff is pushing for full-body scanners to be installed at airports in the wake of the attempted terrorist attack aboard an airliner on Christmas Day. Chertoff is also urging investigators to look into why the alleged terrorist did not have his U.S. visa revoked after negative information about him was passed to U.S. officials.
  • China Executes Briton Accused Of Smuggling Drugs
    Disregarding international appeals for clemency, China has executed a British citizen on charges of drug smuggling. The man's relatives say he had a history of mental illness and was unwittingly lured into the smuggling operation by drug dealers.
  • Hopi Teens Worry About Loss Of Culture
    For nearly 1,000 years, the Hopi people have lived on the same three mesas, land now considered part of northeastern Arizona. For all that time, they have been speaking the Hopi language, which is slowly dying. There are many hurdles standing in the way of preserving Hopi, including, for Hopi teens, the choice between preserving their culture and adopting a modern lifestyle.
  • Letters: Sam, Indian, Music For Kids
    Listeners respond to the story on an undocumented 18-year-old who graduated from high school, but can't go to college because of his illegal status; to the description by a passenger on the Detroit-bound flight of a man as Indian; and a review of '90s alt-rockers who make music for kids. Robert Siegel reads from listeners' e-mails.
  • Turkey Case Highlights Military, Government Rift
    An indictment in the largest and most explosive trial in Turkish history claims that an ultranational gang plotted to overthrow the government. The trial has raised tensions between Turkey's secular military and the ruling party, the AKP, which swept to power in 2002 by a rising class of Turks who identify themselves as religious Muslims.
  • Jon Ronson, Staring (At 'Goats') From The Sidelines
    The Men Who Stare At Goats was in production before Jon Ronson could even finish the book the film is based on. And while the film-adaptation process was a wild, lonely ride for Ronson, he tells NPR's Robert Siegel that he learned a few good lessons from the experience.
  • Leftover Medical Supplies Put To Use Abroad
    U.S. hospitals throw out millions of dollars' worth of unused supplies every year, often because they've been rendered obsolete or simply weren't needed for a particular procedure. Volunteers are finding new homes for these supplies at clinics in the developing world.
  • Fodors' Contributor's Death Left A Virtual Absence
    "Robespierre" was an opinionated and regular contributor to the travel site Fodors.com — until his postings stopped abruptly in July. The contributor had died of cancer. Essayist Henry Alford offers meditation on what it means to lose someone you know only virtually.
  • In Internet Posts, Clues To Accused Terrorist
    There are new details about the suspect in the attempted bombing of a trans-Atlantic flight over Detroit last week. Investigators are sifting through hundreds of Internet postings that appear to have been written by the 23-year-old Nigerian accused of trying to blow up the plane.

Program Archive
  
December 2009
S M T W T F S
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31    
  

MPR News
Radio

Listen Now

Other Radio Streams from MPR

Classical MPR
Radio Heartland
Win Your Dinner Party

The Dinner Party Download™

A fast, funny digest of the week's most interesting news, cuisine, cocktails and culture.

Services