All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Last Place on EarthDuluth head shop owner faces federal charges
    The owner of a Duluth head shop and three workers have been charged in a 54-count indictment accusing them of violating federal drug and regulatory laws.3:50 p.m.
  • Concerned about light rail lineGolden Valley approves fourth light-rail route
    Early plans for what could be the Twin Cities' fourth light-rail transit spoke are moving ahead, with the blessing of the city of Golden Valley.3:54 p.m.
  • Dr. Jon HallbergAsk Dr. Hallberg: The top 10 medical stories of 2012
    MPR's medical analyst Dr. Jon Hallberg joined All Things Considered Tuesday to talk about what he considered the top 10 medical stories of the year, including fungal meningitis, hepatitis C and health issues surrounding Hurricane Sandy.4:17 p.m.
  • Jon Drew works on his 1886 Golding PearlJon Drew's 126-year-old letterpress: Minnesota Sounds and Voices
    There is an alternative to mass-produced holiday greeting cards: Those that are printed, one at a time, on a 126-year old letterpress. And this year, Jon Drew is making the cards as a labor of love, for the widow of the high school teacher who taught him the craft.4:23 p.m.
  • AR-15Gun control: Deep divisions among Minn. DC delegation
    Minnesota's congressional delegation is deeply divided about gun control issues, just days after the massacre of 26 students and teachers at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.5:19 p.m.
  • Recovered gunsGun control efforts in Minn. face cloudy future
    In the wake of the shooting deaths of 20 children and six adults at an elementary school in Connecticut last week, some lawmakers at the Minnesota Capitol say they're considering changing state law to make it tougher to buy guns. But lawmakers disagree over what should be done,5:24 p.m.
  • Last Place on EarthDuluth head shop owner faces federal charges
    The owner of a Duluth head shop and three workers have been charged in a 54-count indictment accusing them of violating federal drug and regulatory laws.5:51 p.m.
  • Concerned about light rail lineGolden Valley approves fourth light-rail route
    Early plans for what could be the Twin Cities' fourth light-rail transit spoke are moving ahead, with the blessing of the city of Golden Valley.5:54 p.m.
  • Dr. Jon HallbergAsk Dr. Hallberg: The top 10 medical stories of 2012
    MPR's medical analyst Dr. Jon Hallberg joined All Things Considered Tuesday to talk about what he considered the top 10 medical stories of the year, including fungal meningitis, hepatitis C and health issues surrounding Hurricane Sandy.6:19 p.m.
  • Jon Drew works on his 1886 Golding PearlJon Drew's 126-year-old letterpress: Minnesota Sounds and Voices
    There is an alternative to mass-produced holiday greeting cards: Those that are printed, one at a time, on a 126-year old letterpress. And this year, Jon Drew is making the cards as a labor of love, for the widow of the high school teacher who taught him the craft.6:24 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Boehner, Obama Closer To A Fiscal Cliff Deal But Not There Yet
    Negotiations continued between the White House and House Speaker John Boehner on Tuesday to avoid the fiscal cliff. Earlier in the day, Boehner prepared his fellow House Republicans for the likelihood that taxes will have to rise on top earners. He's also now talking about a "plan B" if talks fail to come to a deal. Tamara Keith joins Melissa Block from Capitol Hill.
  • Low-Profile Power Player Jack Lew May Be In Line For Treasury Post
    Now the White House chief of staff, Lew finessed the 2011 deal that set up the automatic spending cuts and tax hikes set for the new year — and did it in a way that put President Obama in the catbird seat for the current talks. Now he's a possible pick to be the next Treasury secretary.
  • One Airport's Trash Is 2 Million Worms' Treasure
    Many airports send their discarded french fries, burgers and Cinnabons to the landfill. But Charlotte Douglas International plans to transform that garbage into fertilizer for flower beds. All it needed was a couple of million red wiggler worms.
  • Mich. Governor Vetoes Bill Allowing Concealed Weapons In Schools
    Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder vetoed a bill on Tuesday that would have allowed people with concealed pistol permits to carry guns in schools. He was under widespread pressure to veto it after the school shooting in Newtown, Conn., last week. Robert Siegel talks to Rick Pluta of Michigan Public Radio.
  • Amid Calls For Gun Control, Some Push For Weapons At School
    As a national conversation about stricter gun control takes shape in the wake of the Newtown shooting, some are arguing instead for arming school personnel. Supporters say having armed school officials would help prevent shootings and enable staff to protect children if one occurs.
  • Female Leader May Not Be Enough To Change Male-Dominated South Korea
    The final polls ahead of South Korea's presidential election show Park Geun-hye with a narrow lead over her opponent, and poised to be the first female leader of a country where, until quite recently, men monopolized politics. But feminists say Park, the daughter of a former authoritarian leader Park Chung-hee, is not one of them. Her policies, they say, are no more beneficial for women than those of her opponent. And while they would welcome a female leader, they predict it would do little to change South Korea — where women's representation in government and cases of unequal pay are among the worst in the developed world.
  • In France, Free Birth Control For Girls At Age 15
    Starting in January, the French government will provide contraceptives for girls ages 15 to 18 — without charge and without parental notification. The measure, which passed parliament without debate, aims to reduce teen pregnancies by increasing access to birth control and education.
  • Jersey Shore Residents Draw Line In The Sand Over Dunes After Sandy
    Many residents and officials say New Jersey beach towns with bigger sand dunes suffered the least damage during Hurricane Sandy. The federal government's been working on building up dunes along the coast. On Long Beach Island, N.J., the town's mayor is eager for the beach replenishment work to move forward as soon as possible. But some oceanfront residents oppose federal dune-building. They say it's their land and they don't want the government to build up the dunes in front of their homes, unless they're compensated.
  • Clergy Called On To Help With Healing In Newtown
    The ministers, priests and rabbis of Newtown, Conn., are taking on some of the toughest roles in the wake of the school shootings. They are presiding over funerals, comforting family members and providing support to members of the community.
  • How Much Good Can You Do? There's A Calculator For That
    The "Giving What We Can" campaign urges members to donate 10 percent of their incomes to effective charities. Over many years, the group's calculators suggest, such giving could improve far more lives than you might imagine.

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