All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • Can Eurozone Countries Actually Follow Their Own Rules This Time?
    When the euro was set up in the late 1990s, the Stability and Growth Pact clearly spelled out limits for deficits and debt. But nearly everyone broke those rules, including France and Germany. Now that European leaders are trying to create new rules, the question is — how will they enforce them?
  • The Latest Greek Drama: Government Statistics
    The Greek government has been accused in the past of making its financial figures look better than they really were. But now, the man in charge of the statistical office is being investigated to see if he intentionally made the deficit look worse.
  • Teenage Girls Will Still Need A Prescription For 'Plan B'
    The Food and Drug Administration had decided that a version of the morning-after emergency contraceptive pill could be sold without a prescription to buyers of any age. But the head of the Department of Health and Human Services overruled the FDA.
  • A New Look At The Man Behind U.S. Cold War Policy
    In the late 1970s, historian John Lewis Gaddis decided to write a biography of George F. Kennan, the author of the Cold War policy of containment. But the two men agreed it would not be published until after Kennan's death. Neither expected Kennan to live to 101, but now that he's gone, Gaddis has published George F. Kennan: An American Life.
  • Islamist Parties At Odds In Egypt's Ongoing Elections
    Early results indicate that the incoming Parliament is likely to be dominated by Islamists. But two leading Islamist blocs — the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafists — have little in common and are doing their best to undermine each other.
  • GOP Candidates Affirm Their Support Of Israel
    The GOP presidential contenders addressed the Republican Jewish Coalition Forum Wednesday. Lynn Neary talks to NPR's Ari Shapiro for more.
  • Friendly Advice For Teachers: Beware Of Facebook
    A New Jersey teacher posted comments on Facebook against a gay history exhibit at her school. Another teacher could lose her job for a post in which she called her students future criminals. Incidents like this around the country spark heated debates over privacy and free speech.
  • Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Announces New Inductees
    Lynn Neary and Robert Siegel talks about the 2012 inductees for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The 27th annual induction ceremony is slated to be held next year in Cleveland.
  • A Bird's-Eye History Of Walking On Stilts
    In 1411, the count of Namur banned the use of stilts in the Belgian city. Over the past 600 years, the elevated footwear has been used for everything from putting up drywall to fishing and even jousting.
  • Gingrich's Most Important Adviser: Himself
    The candidate's recent — and sudden — rise in the polls has required him to quickly pull together a larger campaign organization. He has added paid staffers in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina and has a group of unpaid advisers. Still, the chief figure in the Gingrich brain trust remains Gingrich himself.

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