All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Thursday, November 29, 2012

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • Would Raising Taxes On Investment Income Hurt The Economy?
    The rates on capital gains and dividends are on the table in the negotiations over the fiscal cliff. Some complain that it would hurt companies' stock prices, giving them less money to invest. But other economists say it's unlikely to have strong effects.
  • Camp: We Need Spending Cuts To Avoid Fiscal Cliff
    Robert Siegel talks to Republican Dave Camp, chairman of the House Committee on Ways and Means, about the fiscal cliff and tax reform.
  • U.K. Judge: British Press Needs Powerful Watchdog
    An eight month investigation into phone hacking and other abuses by British newspapers has concluded that the industry needs a powerful new watchdog with some legal powers to wield carrots and sticks. Judge Brian Leveson, who led the inquiry, says the watchdog would be independent and insists that it "cannot reasonably or fairly be be characterized as statutory regulation of the press." But Prime Minister David Cameron, who commissioned the investigation, voiced doubts about that, saying "I think it would be a dereliction of our duty in this House of Commons that has stood up for freedom and for free press year after year, century after century, to cross a Rubicon of legislating about the press without thinking about it very carefully, first." Cameron's stance angered victims of tabloid hacking. Said one "I think he's gone back on his word and I feel betrayed."
  • Clinton Reveals Blueprint For An 'AIDS-Free Generation'
    HIV has been declining in many parts of the world over the past decade. Today the U.S. unveiled an ambitious plan to stop most new HIV infections around the world. But some health leaders question whether their goals are realistic, especially with impending budget cuts.
  • In Wake Of Recession, Immigrant Births Plunge
    The Pew Research Center reports that the U.S. birth rate has hit its lowest level ever, led by a dramatic decline among the foreign-born. The birth rate for Mexican women fell the most, down a stunning 23 percent since the recent recession began in 2007.
  • Greenland, Antarctic Ice Is Melting Faster
    The good news: Sea level has risen by just a half-inch in the past 20 years as a result of shrinking ice. The bad news: The melting is now speeding up. Over the next century, this could contribute to another 2- to 3-foot rise in sea level — enough to flood New York City every few years.
  • Tastier Winter Tomatoes, Thanks To A Boom In Greenhouse Growing
    Just because it's cold doesn't mean we should have to give up delicious tomatoes. The "buy-local" movement has spurred a boom in greenhouse grown winter tomatoes in cold climates from Jackson Hole, Wyo., to Madison, Maine. And it uses less water and less land than conventional methods.
  • Tried And True Tricks For Beating A Cold
    Earlier this week, we talked with chefs about global folk cures for a cold. Now Melissa Block reads some recommendations from listeners for methods of easing the sniffles.
  • Space Probe Finds Ice In Mercury's Craters
    On the poles of our solar system's innermost planet, where temperatures can drop to -100 degrees Fahrenheit, researchers have identified water ice and organic "goo," most likely deposited there by comets that crashed into the planet.
  • Which Came First: The Galaxy Or The Black Hole?
    Robert Siegel talks with UT-Austin astrophysicist Karl Gebhardt about his team's discovery of a giant black hole in a tiny galaxy. The discovery contradicts traditional theories of galaxy formation.

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