All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Monday, November 16, 2009

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Vietnamese refugeesMondale's role in saving 'boat people' recalled, 30 years later
    In the years following the end of the Vietnam War, thousands of Vietnamese risked the dangers of the South China Sea instead of facing communism. This year marks 30 years since then-Vice President Walter Mondale convinced world leaders to come to the rescue of more than 1 million "boat people" -- many of whom settled in Minnesota.4:50 p.m.
  • Pawlenty's power to cut state budget lands in court
    A Minnesota judge is weighing whether to temporarily reverse budget cuts made by Gov. Tim Pawlenty at the request of those who say he exceeded his authority.5:20 p.m.
  • Non-profit giving gets a middleman
    If you support Minnesota arts or other non-profit organizations regularly, you've probably gotten at least one e-mail message about "Give to the Max Day." MPR arts reporter Marianne Combs talked about what exactly GiveMN.org is.5:24 p.m.
  • Boarding the NorthstarCommuters give Northstar passing grades
    Hundreds of commuters from the northwestern Twin Cities suburbs made their first trip to work Monday on the new Northstar commuter rail, the latest Minnesota transit project that could lead to fewer people driving to their jobs.5:35 p.m.
  • Northstar commuter trainRoad vs. Rail -- from Big Lake to Minneapolis
    Some commuters will ride the Northstar train to save time on their trip to downtown Minneapolis each day. But will they really get there any faster? MPR News sent two teams to document their trip from Big Lake to Minneapolis this morning to answer that question.5:51 p.m.
  • Big Lake platformSlideshow: First day on the Northstar
    Photos from the first official day of operation of the new Northstar commuter rail line.5:52 p.m.
  • Vietnamese refugeesMondale's role in saving 'boat people' recalled, 30 years later
    In the years following the end of the Vietnam War, thousands of Vietnamese risked the dangers of the South China Sea instead of facing communism. This year marks 30 years since then-Vice President Walter Mondale convinced world leaders to come to the rescue of more than 1 million "boat people" -- many of whom settled in Minnesota.6:20 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Obama Meets Chinese Leader
    President Obama sat down for an informal dinner Monday with his Chinese counterpart, Hu Jintao. Serious discussions were put off until Tuesday when the two leaders will hold a more formal meeting in China's Great Hall of the People. Earlier, Obama told a group of college students in Shanghai that the U.S. welcomes China's growing influence in the world.
  • In China, Obama Backs Open Internet
    President Obama told Chinese students Monday that open Internet access strengthens a society. Qian Jin, a former news assistant at NPR's Shanghai Bureau who was in the audience, says Internet access in China is improving, and broader now than it was a few years ago.
  • Lower Tuna Limit Still Too High, Researchers Say
    The international commission that regulates fishing of tuna and other large migratory fish in the Atlantic voted to sharply reduce the fishing quota for bluefin tuna at their latest meeting. But some scientists say the new quota is too high to sustain the species.
  • Letters: Afghanistan
    Listeners respond to the story from Afghanistan. Melissa Block and Robert Siegel read from listeners' e-mails.
  • Watching TV On Your Computer
    Omar Gallaga, technology culture for the Austin American-Statesman, explores the latest technology options for watching television on your computer and vice versa. Gallaga says there is more aggregation of television content on the Internet in the form of search engines and new Web sites.
  • Can IPhone App Interpret A Baby's Cry?
    A new iPhone application, called Cry Translator, claims that it can help parents interpret the many subtleties in their babies' cries — from hungry to tired to needs a diaper change. Melissa Block puts the app to the test with the help of All Things Considered producer — and new mom — Melissa Gray.
  • Australia Apologizes For Kids Shipped To Colonies
    Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd issued a formal apology Monday for his country's role in Britain's colonial history. Over the course of three centuries, Britain sent tens of thousands of children involuntarily to the colonies. Although they were promised a better life, many were the victims of abuse and neglect. British historian Stephen Constantine says the essence of the policy was to boost Australia's white population.
  • Why This Wisconsin City Is The Best Place To Die
    Joe Hauser lives in La Crosse, Wis., where nearly all older adults have signed a directive outlining their end-of life plans. Hauser's kidneys are failing and he doesn't want to live on a machine, but he's keeping his options open. Talking about end-of-life care helps people make informed choices and have their wishes heard, hospital staff says.
  • Miami Hosts Semipro Football Championship
    Miami hosted a national football championship for the North American Football League over the weekend. Although the game didn't attract much attention, it was the biggest weekend of the year for semipro football, as the Nashville Storm faced off against St. Paul Pioneers.
  • How Do You Say 2010?
    In 45 days, there will be a mob at Times Square counting down. But what do we call the year that kicks in when the ball comes down? The four digits — 2,0,1,0 — are not in dispute, but how we say them evidently is.

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