All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Friday, October 15, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Robert BruininksU of M regents weigh privacy vs. public access in presidential search
    As the search unfolds for a new University of Minnesota president, it can be hard to figure out how deep the candidate pool is. And the Board of Regents may not make it any easier, because it's concerned about releasing the names of finalists for the post.4:14 p.m.
  • Jane Wilson and class'Aunt Jane' to Chinese immigrants is honored this weekend
    A Minneapolis woman known for her decades-long work with Chinese immigrants in the city is being honored this weekend for her contributions as an "honorary Chinese Minnesotan."4:19 p.m.
  • Matt BurgessNovel describes the love stories behind a dogfight
    Minneapolis-based writer Matt Burgess says when he wanted to call his first novel "Dogfight," his editor suggested softening it a little. Now it's called "Dogfight, a love story." The novel, which is the story of a bumbling drug dealer in New York, was snapped up by publishers within days.4:50 p.m.
  • Rep. Tim WalzWalz wants Coleman to disclose funders behind new ads
    U.S. Rep. Tim Walz's campaign is calling on former Republican Sen. Norm Coleman to disclose who is funding his political organization.5:15 p.m.
  • PoliGraph: 3rd District ads get mixed verdicts
    Wall Street, ethics violations and climate change are all popping up in the fight for the 3rd district's congressional seat. PoliGraph analyzed two ads from the race between Republican incumbent Erik Paulsen and his opponent, Jim Meffert, and found the results to be mixed.5:18 p.m.
  • New Minneapolis Parks superintendent Jayne Miller
    Jayne Miller, the new superintendent of the Minneapolis Park system, is preparing to assume her new responsibilities in November. She'll oversee one of the largest park systems in the country with 182 park properties, including nearly 50 recreation centers.5:35 p.m.
  • Thousands of nonprofits could lose tax exemptions today
    Small Minnesota nonprofits that haven't filed returns with the IRS for at least three years are going to be in big trouble after midnight tonight.5:46 p.m.
  • Robert BruininksU of M regents weigh privacy vs. public access in presidential search
    As the search unfolds for a new University of Minnesota president, it can be hard to figure out how deep the candidate pool is. And the Board of Regents may not make it any easier, because it's concerned about releasing the names of finalists for the post.6:14 p.m.
  • Jane Wilson and class'Aunt Jane' to Chinese immigrants is honored this weekend
    A Minneapolis woman known for her decades-long work with Chinese immigrants in the city is being honored this weekend for her contributions as an "honorary Chinese Minnesotan."6:19 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • What's At Stake In 2010 Governors' Races
    Voters in 37 states will cast ballots for governor in November. The outcomes will affect not just governance in those states -- the newly elected governors could tilt the playing field in the 2012 presidential election, and many could shape the future of Congress through their role in redistricting.
  • Week In Politics: Midterms, 'Don't Ask'
    Melissa Block speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times about the week in politics.
  • Countrywide CEO To Pay $67.5M In SEC Settlement
    Angelo Mozilo, the former CEO of Countrywide Financial, will pay $67.5 million in penalties to settle a civil fraud suit filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission. Mozilo built Countrywide into the nation's largest mortgage lender, but it was sold to Bank of America after it ran into trouble in the subprime lending debacle. The settlement bars Mozilo from serving as an officer or director of a public company.
  • The Art Of Writing And Selling Memoirs
    Guest host Mary Louise Kelly talks with Sarah Crichton about the recent memoirs of teen star Justin Bieber and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Crichton is the publisher of Sarah Crichton Books at Farrar, Straus and Giroux, and has assisted many memoirists, including former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.
  • Contemplating The 'Hereafter,' Unhurriedly
    Clint Eastwood takes on a new kind of project: a supernatural drama that quietly meditates on the afterlife, following several characters who've had brushes with death. Matt Damon's reluctant psychic struggles with his gift, a writer reacts to nearly dying and a young boy grieves for his lost twin.
  • Gay Troops Sit Tight While Courts Debate 'Don't Ask'
    After a week of legal maneuvers, it's not entirely clear whether the Pentagon's "don't ask, don't tell" policy is dead or alive. The law bars openly gay people from serving in the military. A federal judge this week issued an injunction barring the Pentagon from enforcing the law; the Justice Department has asked another court to reverse the injunction. Where does that leave things?
  • Texas Official Speaks Publicly About Growing Up Gay
    In the wake of recent teen suicides, many people are posting video testimonials telling young gays that, later in life, "It Gets Better." Joel Burns is an openly gay city councilman in Fort Worth, Texas. At a council meeting on Tuesday, he spoke about his painful experience as a gay teen. Host Melissa Block talks with Burns about that and his decision to speak out.
  • Poor Single Mother With Lots Of Credit Cards. (It's Not What You Think.)
    Not every transaction between a poor person and a credit-card company ends up with the credit-card company on top.
  • Humor Helped Author Cope With High-Risk Birth
    In Half-Baked: The Story of My Nerves, My Newborn, and How We Both Learned to Breathe, Alexa Stevenson tells the trouble she had getting pregnant, the trouble she had staying pregnant, and then the months her daughter spent in intensive care. And she writes with it with a sense of humor.
  • Outside Groups Target Close Ohio Races
    The state is the scene of contests for congressional seats held by Democrats but where Republicans are looking for victory. One of those congressional races is in Cincinnati; the other a sprawling district in the state's southeast.

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