All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Friday, September 28, 2012

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Andrew EngeldingerMinneapolis shooting victims, suspect, identified
    Minneapolis Police Chief Tim Dolan told a Friday afternoon news conference that the gunman in Thursday's attack was 36-year-old Andrew J. Engeldinger of Minneapolis.3:49 p.m.
  • Allen QuistPoliGraph: 1st District debate examined
    In their first debate, 1st District DFL Congressman Tim Walz and his Republican opponent Allen Quist went head-to-head on a range of topics, from health care to the economy. This week, PoliGraph looked at five of Walz and Quist's claims.3:54 p.m.
  • Orchestra contracts near expiration
    Time is running out for the Minnesota Orchestra and St. Paul Chamber Orchestra to reach new labor agreements with their musicians unions. Both contracts expire at midnight Sunday. Even though the orchestras don't command the crowds professional sports teams do, work stoppages would cause economic pain in their respective hometowns.4:49 p.m.
  • Andrew EngeldingerMinneapolis shooting victims, suspect, identified
    Minneapolis Police Chief Tim Dolan told a Friday afternoon news conference that the gunman in Thursday's attack was 36-year-old Andrew J. Engeldinger of Minneapolis.5:17 p.m.
  • Allen QuistPoliGraph: 1st District debate examined
    In their first debate, 1st District DFL Congressman Tim Walz and his Republican opponent Allen Quist went head-to-head on a range of topics, from health care to the economy. This week, PoliGraph looked at five of Walz and Quist's claims.5:24 p.m.
  • A concept for the Vikings stadiumVikings: Texas firm to design new stadium
    The Minnesota Stadium Facilities Authority and the Minnesota Vikings have selected Dallas-based HKS to design its new $1 billion stadium.5:54 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • In Presidential Ads, A Shared Strategy For Connection
    In new ads from President Obama and challenger Mitt Romney, the candidates talk directly to the camera. Obama is also putting out longer television spots. Why the change of style?
  • Week In Politics: U.N. General Assembly, Debates
    Melissa Block talks to regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times. They discuss the upcoming presidential debates, the UN General Assembly, and the return of the NFL's regular refs.
  • Apple's New Maps Become Major Embarrassment
    Apple has apologized for it new map software which has led to a flood of customer complaints. The company dropped the popular Google maps app for its own version on the iPhone 5. CEO Tim Cook said the company "is extremely sorry for the frustration this has caused our customers." He said Apple's map application will improve and that customers can download alternatives in the meantime.
  • Disgraced Chinese Leader Ousted From Party
    Disgraced senior Chinese politician Bo Xilai has been expelled from the Communist party, and will now face criminal charges. The Xinhua news agency says he's accused of abusing power, taking bribes and having improper sexual relations with women. It also implicates him in the murder case involving his wife, saying he made serious mistakes for which he will have to take responsibility.
  • The Weird Story Of Why Helium Prices Are Going Through The Roof
    The story begins in the 1920s, when the U.S. government thought blimps might be the next big thing in warfare.
  • Can't Change Your Money In Iran? Try Afghanistan
    Large sums of Iranian currency come into western Afghanistan every day and are exchanged for dollars, and then shipped back to Iran. There may be international sanctions against Iran, but in Afghan provinces that border the Islamic Republic, trade and money laundering are thriving.
  • Crucial Parliamentary Elections Near In Georgia
    Parliamentary elections take place in Georgia on Monday. The country's president, a reformer and darling of the U.S. government, is accused of corruption and increasingly repressive tactics. He's being opposed by a multi-billionaire who made most of his money in Russia.
  • Buyer Of $7 Renoir Painting May Not Profit After All
    Melissa Block talks to Ian Shapira of The Washington Post. He reported that the Renoir painting found at a flea market — and purchased for $7 — was actually stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art more than 60 years ago.
  • Fans Cheer NFL Refs As They Return To The Field
    The refs are back! After three weeks of bizarre rulings, controversy, and near player revolt, the NFL ended the referee lockout this week. The regular officials came back just in time for Thursday night's game between the Baltimore Ravens and Cleveland Browns. The regular refs returned as heroes — until they made their first blown call. Robert Siegel talks to sportswriter Stefan Fatsis.
  • Ohio Arts Groups Merge To Solve Their Budget Woes
    Orchestras, ballet and opera companies across the U.S. have been forced to make cuts to staff and performances — some even facing bankruptcy — during the economic decline. The arts community in Dayton, Ohio, is trying something different. The city's orchestra, opera and ballet are merging into one non-profit entity, sharing staff and costs. Organizers say despite the cultural differences between the three, the new entity can offer audiences new, collaborative programming. They say it can also be a model for other arts organizations across the country that are trying to find new ways to survive.

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