All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Julie LaneIsanti County -- how to help the 'new poor'
    The foreclosure crisis has hit Isanti County, about an hour north of the Twin Cities, particularly hard. It's put a great deal of pressure on local governments and nonprofit groups to provide assistance to residents who are in bad financial shape, even as many of them are too proud to accept it.3:50 p.m.
  • PoliGraph: Union right on Emmer's transportation votes
    A new mailer from the Minnesota AFL-CIO links Republican gubernatorial candidate Tom Emmer to the I-35W bridge collapse. Tom Crann talks to Catharine Richert about the mailing's claims about Emmer's voting record on transportation issues.4:53 p.m.
  • Archbishop John NienstedtUnnamed donor paid for Catholic DVD against same-sex marriage
    An anonymous donor paid for the Catholic Church in Minnesota to produce and distribute a DVD opposing same-sex marriage, Archbishop John Nienstedt said Wednesday.5:20 p.m.
  • Video opposing same-sex marriageArchbishop John Nienstedt on Catholic Church's opposition to same-sex marriage
    Transcript of Tom Crann's interview with Archbishop John Nienstedt about the DVD and the Catholic Church's opposition to same-sex marriage.5:28 p.m.
  • Julie LaneIsanti County -- how to help the 'new poor'
    The foreclosure crisis has hit Isanti County, about an hour north of the Twin Cities, particularly hard. It's put a great deal of pressure on local governments and nonprofit groups to provide assistance to residents who are in bad financial shape, even as many of them are too proud to accept it.5:51 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Obama Reaffirms Commitment To Aid Poor Nations
    President Obama says he's overhauling the way the U.S. aids poor nations around the world and stepping up its commitment to fight hunger and disease. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Michele Kelemen about the president's U.N. speech.
  • Amid Slow Recovery, Haiti's Tent Cities Remain
    The task of getting Haitians displaced by January's devastating earthquake out of tents into temporary shelters is going far more slowly than planned. Aid agencies have built only 10 percent of 130,000 units of temporary housing that were promised.
  • Sloppy Paperwork Forces Halt To Some Foreclosures
    Tens of thousands of home foreclosures have been thrown into question because paperwork may not have been reviewed properly. GMAC Mortgage, which is owned by Ally Financial, has halted evictions in 23 states while it goes back to check and, in some cases, correct certain court documents.
  • Life, Death Of WWII Spy Transfixes British Public
    A quiet and reclusive elderly lady died in the British coastal town of Torquay the other day. She had no known relatives and no friends, so local authorities entered her home. They found papers and medals that revealed that she was far from the typical pensioner. Eileen Nearne -- aka Agent Rose, one of only a few dozen female spies dispatched by Britain into occupied France in World War II to work with the French Resistance.
  • Letters: 'Waiting For Superman'
    Listeners respond to a report on the new documentary Waiting for Superman. NPR's Robert Siegel and David Greene read from listeners' e-mails.
  • Obama Tries To Sell Health Care, Again
    Thursday marks six months since the passage of the president's health care overhaul measure. By now, it was supposed to be popular. Not so far.
  • The Pressures Of Working In The White House
    The announced departure of Larry Summers as President Obama's chief economic adviser means that after two years, most of the White House economic team is gone. NPR's Robert Siegel talks to Greg Mankiw, former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers about the pressures of working for the commander in chief.
  • John Wright: The Man Who Killed The BP Gulf Spill
    John Wright, the man who put the coup de grace on the BP oil spill in the Gulf, talks with host David Greene about the challenges of drilling a relief well thousands of feet under the sea.
  • FCC To Weigh In On 'White Spaces'
    On Thursday, the Federal Communications Commission will likely open the door for what some in the tech industry are calling Wi-Fi on steroids. The FCC is scheduled to vote on unlicensed use of the so-called white spaces between TV channels. Computer companies are pleased. But broadcasters and wireless microphone users are wary about losing control of their spectrum.
  • City's Parking Tickets Tell Drivers To Strike Yoga Pose
    David Greene talks to Lillian Hsu, of the Cambridge Arts Council about parking tickets in Cambridge, Mass., illustrated with a series of yoga poses.

Program Archive
  
September 2010
S M T W T F S
      1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30    
  

MPR News
Radio

Listen Now

On Air

BBC Newshour

Other Radio Streams from MPR

Classical MPR
Radio Heartland
Win Your Dinner Party

The Dinner Party Download™

A fast, funny digest of the week's most interesting news, cuisine, cocktails and culture.

Services