All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Monday, September 12, 2011

Minnesota Public Radio Stories


National Public Radio Stories

  • Possible Greek Default Worries European Politicians
    Deepening concerns that debt-troubled Greece might default — and increasingly strident comments by several politicians in Germany about that possibility — helped send European markets sharply lower Monday. One German politician said it can't be ruled out that Greece might have to leave the eurozone. French banks — which are heavily exposed to the Greek debt — were particularly hard hit Monday, with some leading banks down more than 10 percent.
  • How Did Europe's Financial Crisis Start?
    Michele Norris talks to Michael Mackenzie, U.S. markets editor at the Financial Times, about Europe's deepening debt crisis: how it started, what the global markets can expect and what that all means for the U.S.
  • GOP Presidential Hopefuls To Debate In Tampa
    For the second time in less than a week, the field of GOP presidential hopefuls will meet for a debate. This one takes place Monday in Tampa, Fla. And it's notable in that it's the first presidential debate with a Tea Party group as a co-sponsor. CNN is the media partner for the event. When the candidates squared off last week, there was some lively sparring over Social Security and health care. There will likely be more of that Monday. For more, Michele Norris talks to NPR's Don Gonyea.
  • Comcast Offers A Digital Lifeline To The Disconnected
    The cable giant now offers Internet access to low-income families for $9.95 per month. Stipulated by its merger with NBCUniversal, the effort is meant to help children access resources they need for school. But families need more than cheap Internet access to bridge the digital divide, experts say.
  • Letters: Sept. 11 Memories
    Michele Norris reads from listener emails about a story that aired on Friday's program.
  • Turkish Leader Begins 'Arab Spring' Tour
    Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyep Erdogan is visiting the three Arab countries that this year ousted long-time authoritarian leaders — Libya, Egypt and Tunisia. Turkey is playing an increasingly prominent role in the region and is looking to start on good terms with the new leaders in these countries.
  • Arab Spring Blooms On Libyan Radio
    In Libya, the airwaves have been liberated from years of control by the regime of dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Now, Libyans can hear foreign radio broadcasts, express themselves freely on call-in shows and listen to music with messages that would have once gotten them thrown into prison.
  • Agency Takes New Approach To Save Everglades Land
    In Florida, federal officials have released plans for a new wildlife preserve just south of Orlando. The Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge will include at least 150,000 acres, but there's a twist — most of it will remain under private ownership.
  • Book Reviews: Back-To-School Novels
    Alan Cheuse reviews two new novels set in schools. The Highest Frontier by Joan Slonczewski is about a young woman attending a college in outer space. In The Fall They Come Back by Robert Bausch is about a young teacher beginning his career at a Virginia prep school.
  • Broadway's 'Follies,' Sounding As Sumptuous As Ever
    Many Broadway revivals trim their budgets by downsizing the orchestra, but a new Follies features 28 musicians in the pit. Jeff Lunden speaks with orchestrator Jonathan Tunick about working on the Stephen Sondheim score, which evokes Broadway styles of the '20s, '30s and '40s — as well as the contemporary music of 1971.

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