All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Nurses picketTwin Cities nurses: Potential strike would last one day
    Twin Cities nurses considering a strike to protest staffing levels and cuts to their pension plan say the possible walkout would last only one day.3:49 p.m.
  • MnDOT biodiesel trucksAlternative fuel vehicles find more use among fleets
    Much of the crude oil consumed in the U.S. is used to create the fuel we burn in our cars and trucks. Now, some managers of fleet vehicles in both the private and public sectors are making efforts to reduce their dependence on crude by using alternative fuel vehicles.3:54 p.m.
  • Dr. Jon HallbergDr. Jon Hallberg answers top food allergy questions
    With trees in leaf and flowers in bloom, this is the time of year people are thinking about -- and complaining about -- allergies. Over the next few weeks, MPR's All Things Considered will talk about different allergies with our medical analyst, Dr. Jon Hallberg.4:49 p.m.
  • Ignition interlock devicePawlenty signs law requiring ignition locks for drunk drivers
    Convicted drunken drivers in Minnesota will soon have to prove that they're sober when trying to start their vehicle.5:20 p.m.
  • Medtronic headquartersMedical device makers give FDA official an earful
    The federal official who oversees the review and approval of medical devices came to the Twin Cities Tuesday, to hear what industry leaders and medical experts have to say about how the agency is doing its job. They aired a host of complaints.5:24 p.m.
  • Nurses picketTwin Cities nurses: Potential strike would last one day
    Twin Cities nurses considering a strike to protest staffing levels and cuts to their pension plan say the possible walkout would last only one day.5:50 p.m.
  • MnDOT biodiesel trucksAlternative fuel vehicles find more use among fleets
    Much of the crude oil consumed in the U.S. is used to create the fuel we burn in our cars and trucks. Now, some managers of fleet vehicles in both the private and public sectors are making efforts to reduce their dependence on crude by using alternative fuel vehicles.5:55 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Suicide Bomber Strikes NATO Convoy In Afghanistan
    A Taliban militant crashed his explosives-laden car into a NATO convoy in the heart of Kabul, killing six Western soldiers -- five of them American -- and a dozen Afghans. It was the first major attack in the capital since February.
  • An Update On Marjah, Months After Offensive
    Earlier this year, the U.S. military began an offensive in Marjah to push out the Taliban. After initial reports of resistance, then success, the Taliban have resumed their insurgency, and Afghan civilians are fleeing the area. Marie Colvin of The Sunday Times talks to Robert Siegel about her experiences in Marjah, where she was embedded with the Marines early last week.
  • In Seattle, The WNBA Reigns
    In 2008, new owners moved the NBA SuperSonics to Oklahoma City. But they let the Sonics' sister team, the Storm, stay in Seattle, when four loyal fans stepped up to buy the team. Now the WNBA is the only pro basketball in town. And although the Storm would like to attract some of the former Sonics' fans, they're not going to beg.
  • In Ohio, Obama Pushes Economic Policies
    President Obama took a day trip to Youngstown, Ohio, on Tuesday, for the latest in a series of economic policy-themed events outside of Washington. The administration calls it the "White House to Main Street Tour." The goal is to show that President Obama is in touch with Americans' concerns about jobs and the economy.
  • On-The-Job Training While Unemployed
    An innovative program in Georgia allows workers to continue to get paid weekly unemployment benefits while receiving up to six weeks of on-the-job training. Thousands of people have been hired after participating, and experts say it's a model that other states should consider.
  • Mexico's Drug War: A Rigged Fight?
    NPR News investigation: Ciudad Juarez is ground zero for Mexican President Felipe Calderon's war against his country's ruthless drug cartels. But there's strong evidence that federal forces there appear to be favoring Mexico's largest, oldest and most powerful cartel, the Sinaloa.
  • TV Networks Prepare To Unveil Fall Lineups
    The broadcast TV networks are rolling out their new seasons in presentations to advertisers this week. All eyes are on NBC, which is trying to recover its prime-time lineup from the disaster of Jay Leno at 10 p.m.
  • Gotan Project: An International Spin On Argentina's Tango
    The Parisian group pioneered the art of merging traditional tango and modern pop into electronic dance music. On Gotan Project's new album, Tango 3.0, Banning Eyre says the band truly globalizes Argentina's most beloved musical export.
  • Tuesday Primary Races Test Incumbents
    Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Mara Liasson and Don Gonyea about primary races in Kentucky, Pennsylvania and Arkansas.
  • Blumenthal Says He Misspoke On Vietnam Record
    Longtime Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal has said he regrets having "misspoken" about his military service in the Vietnam era. Blumenthal, a candidate for U.S. Senate, is defending himself after a New York Times report shows that his words don't match the record.

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