All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Friday, April 23, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Lake BemidjiLeech Lake leaders want to halt fishing protest
    Leaders on the Leech Lake Indian Reservation say they will work to resolve differences over treaty rights through conversation with state officials and diplomacy, instead of a demonstration before the state's fishing opener next month.4:50 p.m.
  • Canisteo pitWhile agencies disagree, old mine pit keeps filling with water
    A disagreement between two government agencies has stalemated a solution to a big problem for the Iron Range town of Bovey. That's where a nearby mine pit continues filling with water that could inundate Bovey if not stopped.4:54 p.m.
  • UMD chancellor addresses allegations of student racism on Facebook
    Administrators at the University of Minnesota Duluth campus are still dealing with race issues that went viral there last week.5:20 p.m.
  • New 3M product3M is bringing back the 'magic'
    3M reports its first quarter profits next week. These days, a growing portion of the industrial giant's sales are coming from new products. It's a payoff from the company's steady investment of more than $1 billion annually in research and development.5:24 p.m.
  • John MartyCandidates for Minn. gov woo undecided DFL delegates
    The DFL candidates for governor are making a last-minute push to court delegates at the state party convention in Duluth. The main order of business for the nearly 1,400 delegates comes Saturday, when they endorse a candidate for governor. The candidates are focusing on undecided delegates.5:50 p.m.
  • Lake BemidjiLeech Lake leaders want to halt fishing protest
    Leaders on the Leech Lake Indian Reservation say they will work to resolve differences over treaty rights through conversation with state officials and diplomacy, instead of a demonstration before the state's fishing opener next month.6:20 p.m.
  • Canisteo pitWhile agencies disagree, old mine pit keeps filling with water
    A disagreement between two government agencies has stalemated a solution to a big problem for the Iron Range town of Bovey. That's where a nearby mine pit continues filling with water that could inundate Bovey if not stopped.6:24 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • U.S. Indicts 11 Suspected Somali Pirates
    Eleven suspects were indicted Friday in a federal court in Norfolk, Va., on piracy and other counts related to attacks on U.S. Navy vessels.
  • Suspected Pirates Prove Difficult To Prosecute
    Most suspected pirates caught around the Horn of Africa are released because there is no clear system for prosecuting them. J. Peter Pham, Africa project director at the National Committee on American Foreign Policy, joins Melissa Block to explain why.
  • Week In Politics: Financial Overhaul, Charlie Crist
    Melissa Block reviews the week's biggest political stories with columnists E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times.
  • Media Focuses On 'Bad News'
    A poll by the Pew Research Center and NPR found that trust in government has hit near record lows. For people to judge public officials they need information they find credible. Executives at three very different kinds of news outlets in Atlanta wrestle with their own trust issues.
  • 'Chronicle' Writer, 28, Dies Of Cancer
    A 28-year-old journalist who wrote about her battle with a rare form of cancer in a column for the San Francisco Chronicle died Thursday. Her 17-part series, "Alicia's Story," drew thousands of followers.
  • Gloom Greets IMF, World Bank Meetings
    Finance ministers from around the world will gather in Washington this weekend for meetings of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. The world economic outlook has brightened since last year's meetings, but the IMF is far from sanguine about the future. Last year's worries about private sector debt and bank failures have been replaced by even more serious concerns that whole countries could default as a result of their own dramatically rising debt burdens.
  • Tyranny Of High Expectations Plagues Shanghai Expo
    After an eight-year build-up, the final countdown is on: Shanghai's World Expo opens May 1. Crowds and endless queues marked the $45 billion, half-year-long extravaganza's soft opening this week. Already, complaints from visitors and a copyright scandal have bedeviled the event.
  • A-Rod Breaches Baseball Etiquette
    Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez pushed Oakland Athletics pitcher Dallas Braden over the edge Thursday when he walked over the pitcher's mound. Melissa Block talks about A-Rod's foul play with Paul Dickson, author of The Unwritten Rules of Baseball: The Etiquette, Conventional Wisdom, and Axiomatic Codes of Our National Pastime.
  • Finding The 'Courage' Of Midlake
    The musicians of Midlake wear their influences on their sleeves, to the point where the band has been dismissed as "talented mimics." But Midlake spent three years crafting The Courage of Others and has the scars to show for it.
  • Intern Uprising: Songs Our Bosses Missed
    Finally out from under the oppressive rule of their tyrannical employers, NPR Music's fearless interns finally get to speak their minds. It's time for the bigwigs to step aside and let the interns sing the praises of the music their bosses have overlooked in 2010.

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