All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • ELSA: Enabling Language Service AnywhereTranslation device bridges language gap for emergency responders
    A screaming baby is badly burned, but the mother doesn't speak English and paramedics cannot communicate with her. But the stressful episode is diffused because of a new device that quickly helps locate a translator.3:49 p.m.
  • Empty lotSlowing frac sand industry leaves mark on SE Minn.
    The southeastern Minnesota facilities that produce and process silica sand used in hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, were booming a year ago. But now, natural gas prices are down -- and so is the demand for the sand.3:53 p.m.
  • Tim WalzMomentum for gun control legislation slows in Washington
    Since the mass killing of 26 students and teachers at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. four months ago, opinion polls have shown strong support for gun control measures. This week, the Senate could begin debating expanded background checks for gun buyers although it is still unclear if the legislation will overcome a possible Republican filibuster.4:50 p.m.
  • Rich StanekMinnesota lawmakers debate competing background check bills
    Minnesota lawmakers continue to debate two competing background check bills. If a universal background check law is passed by Congress, what does that mean for the debate over gun control at the state Capitol?4:54 p.m.
  • HospitalDFL spending cuts target hospitals, HMOs
    Minnesota House Democrats are proposing a health and human services budget that spares drastic cuts to poor people, the elderly and people with disabilities. Instead, the proposal would raise about $152 million through additional charges on the state's hospitals and HMOs.5:20 p.m.
  • ELSA: Enabling Language Service AnywhereTranslation device bridges language gap for emergency responders
    A screaming baby is badly burned, but the mother doesn't speak English and paramedics cannot communicate with her. But the stressful episode is diffused because of a new device that quickly helps locate a translator.5:24 p.m.
  • Empty lotSlowing frac sand industry leaves mark on SE Minn.
    The southeastern Minnesota facilities that produce and process silica sand used in hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, were booming a year ago. But now, natural gas prices are down -- and so is the demand for the sand.5:50 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • A View From South Korea: The North Is 'A Playground Bully'
    "It's like a joke," one retiree in Seoul says of the North's daily provocations. His view is shared by many South Koreans, who believe leaders in the North are trying to extort more aid from other nations and are trying to bolster their own positions.
  • Kerry Hopes 'Shuttle Diplomacy' Will Spur Mideast Peace Talks
    Secretary of State John Kerry was in Israel for the third time in as many weeks in an attempt to bring back to life serious peace negotiations between Israeli and Palestinian officials. The Palestinians appear to have a number of conditions, including prisoner releases, a freeze on settlements and a map of the borders Israel will accept. Israel has made it clear no map will kick off the peace process and remains focused on security.
  • New York's Penn Station Makeover Faces Arena-Sized Obstacle
    Every day, more than 600,000 thousand rail commuters navigate the crowded maze of tunnels and tracks that is Penn Station. Mass transit advocates would like to replace the aging station with a world-class transportation hub. But there's a big obstacle: Madison Square Garden, the arena that sits directly on top of Penn Station. And the Garden's owners show no signs of moving.
  • How Louisville Went From 'Little Brother' To Powerhouse
    University of Louisville fans have had a lot to cheer about lately — and not just basketball. Monday's big victory by the school's men's basketball team over Michigan is just the latest success for an athletic department that is quickly becoming one of the country's most admired.
  • Giant-Killing Louisville Women Look To Keep Charmed Run Alive
    The Louisville women haven't beaten UConn in 20 years — including a 22-point loss to the Huskies in the 2009 women's national championship game. And Connecticut breezed in their last matchup in January. But as any tournament watcher knows, January is ancient history when it comes to March — and April — madness.
  • Obama's Late Budget Submission A Strategic Move
    President Obama submits his budget on Wednesday and he's more than two months late. But there's a political strategy behind his tardiness — he waited until after both House Republicans and Senate Democrats passed their budget plans.
  • Will The Future GOP Be More Libertarian?
    Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul thinks embracing libertarian ideas is one way the party can be more inclusive. And GOP leaders are starting to think he might be on to something.
  • After Missteps, Does J.C. Penney Stand Another Chance?
    After losing many customers through an unsuccessful face-lift attempt by Ron Johnson, J.C. Penney will be led by former CEO Myron Ullman. One analyst says it must "embrace" its customers to recuperate, but others wonder if it can survive.
  • Austin Is Latest Test Bed For Google's High-Speed Experiment
    Google announced Tuesday that its Google Fiber project would be hitting Austin, Texas, next. The tech giant's blazing fast Internet service, with current rates at 1 Gpbs, is about 100 times faster than your typical cable broadband Internet service.
  • Kansas City Slow To Connect With Google's Super Fast Internet
    Google has already rolled out an experimental broadband network in parts of Kansas City.

Program Archive
  
April 2013
S M T W T F S
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30        
  

MPR News
Radio

Listen Now

On Air

The World

Other Radio Streams from MPR

Classical MPR
Radio Heartland
Win Your Dinner Party

The Dinner Party Download™

A fast, funny digest of the week's most interesting news, cuisine, cocktails and culture.

Services