All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Friday, March 26, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Glenn JohnsonCounting the homeless a challenge for census workers
    The U.S. Census has launched a major public relations campaign to make sure everyone fills out the forms that arrived earlier this month, but it will take more than a good PR campaign to count people who don't have a permanent place to live.3:49 p.m.
  • Target FieldTarget Field -- how to get there, where to park
    The new Target Field in Minneapolis gets its first test run this weekend as the University of Minnesota baseball team hosts Louisiana Tech Saturday afternoon. The Twins play there for the first time in just a week. Getting to the stadium is a whole new ballgame, too.3:54 p.m.
  • Teacher Adrian LibertyLeech Lake tribal members try to break the cycle of obesity
    In northern Minnesota, the Ojibwe are making some progress battling the unhealthy eating habits that are closely linked to higher rates of Type 2 diabetes.4:50 p.m.
  • State Sen. Mee MouaMoua backs off gang database restrictions
    The St. Paul lawmaker who was pushing to crack down on secret police files in the wake of the Gang Strike Force scandal has backed off that effort.5:20 p.m.
  • Mohamed Aden and sonSuburban dad leaves Burnsville to govern in Somalia
    Somali-Americans in Minnesota have long been told they have a duty to help their homeland. But few took that calling to heart like Mohamed Aden.5:22 p.m.
  • Glenn JohnsonCounting the homeless a challenge for census workers
    The U.S. Census has launched a major public relations campaign to make sure everyone fills out the forms that arrived earlier this month, but it will take more than a good PR campaign to count people who don't have a permanent place to live.5:50 p.m.
  • Target FieldTarget Field -- how to get there, where to park
    The new Target Field in Minneapolis gets its first test run this weekend as the University of Minnesota baseball team hosts Louisiana Tech Saturday afternoon. The Twins play there for the first time in just a week. Getting to the stadium is a whole new ballgame, too.5:55 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • U.S. Signs New Arms Control Treaty With Russia
    The U.S. and Russia have reached final agreement on a new strategic arms treaty, President Obama announced Friday. The treaty replaces the now expired START treaty and limits each side to 1,550 warheads, about one-third fewer than currently allowed, and 700 deployed missiles and bombers.
  • Ripple Effect Of U.S.-Russia Nuke Pact
    A new arms control treaty between U.S. and Russia promises to reduce the nuclear arsenals of the former Cold War rivals. Robert Siegel talks with Nicholas Burns, a professor at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government and former undersecretary of state, about the importance of the new treaty.
  • Challenger Edges Out Maliki In Iraq
    Former Prime Minister Ayad Allawi's coalition beat out Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's coalition by a narrow margin in parliamentary elections. That means Allawi's alliance will get a first shot at trying to form a government. Robert Siegel speaks with NPR Baghdad Bureau Chief Quil Lawrence.
  • Week In Politics: Health Care Bill Passes
    After a bitter fight and last-minute changes by the Senate, the House gave final approval to the Obama administration's health care overhaul Thursday. David Brooks of The New York Times and E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post offer their insight.
  • A Fix For Banks Too Big To Fail: Cut 'Em Down To Size
    Simon Johnson is co-author of the book 13 Bankers, about how deregulation and Wall Street's relationship with Washington contributed to the financial crisis. Johnson says there's no virtue whatsoever in huge banks
  • Shocking TV Experiment Sparks Ethical Concerns
    A French documentary recently staged a fake game show to demonstrate that people are willing to punish — and even kill — to be on TV. Psychologists have questioned the value of such research when it jeopardizes subjects' mental health.
  • Double Feature: 'Dragon,' 'Waking Sleeping Beauty'
    NPR movie critic Bob Mondello reviews the new animated picture from Dreamworks, How to Train Your Dragon, and Waking Sleeping Beauty, a documentary about the troubled Disney animation unit in the early '80s and how it reinvented itself with The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast and other films.
  • March Madness Wrapup
    Robert Siegel talks with sports writer Stefan Fatsis about the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament. The NCAA is thinking of expanding the tournament to 96 teams instead of the current 64. The two also discuss Cornell's loss and how Northern Iowa's big wins have been a boon for the coach.
  • The End Of The Line For GM-Toyota Joint Venture
    New United Motor Manufacturing Inc., a California factory run by both General Motors and Toyota, will close next week. Over the years, the line produced 8 million high-quality cars and trucks. But workers say the line also had its fair share of controversial practices.
  • Treasury Announces Plan To Prevent Foreclosures
    The Treasury Department is unveiling an aggressive plan to help shut down the nation's foreclosure crisis. The plan would reduce the amount some troubled borrowers owe on their home loans.

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