All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Minnesota reading test scores show achievement gap persists
    New test scores show Minnesota students are still above the national average in reading, but there's still a wide gap between how well white students perform compared with students of color.3:50 p.m.
  • Atom EgoyanFilm director Atom Egoyan examines infidelity
    Canadian film director Atom Egoyan is internationally acclaimed for his edgy movies, which explore the intricacies of human relationships. His new film "Chloe" presents some curious, and at times graphic, twists on marital infidelity.3:52 p.m.
  • The next mortgage mess approaches
    We've worried for months now about the next wave of mortgage problems. People who watch this stuff closely say it's approaching. While it won't be as bad as the wave of delinquencies and foreclosures that crippled home values the past two years, it will still hurt. There's some evidence it may land particularly hard on parts of central Minnesota and some of the Twin Cities far suburbs.4:15 p.m.
  • Lynne Rossetto KasperLynne Rossetto Kasper on our shifting cuisine culture
    Lynne Rossetto Kasper, host of The Splendid Table from American Public Media, joined All Things Considered to share some tips for parents of picky eaters.4:20 p.m.
  • Choosing lean meatCombating food illiteracy
    Some health experts say Americans' ignorance about nutrition is fueling the obesity epidemic.4:49 p.m.
  • Minn. lawmakers send health compromise to governor
    After weeks of legislative drama involving a veto, a failed override, a lawsuit and a last-minute deal, the Minnesota Legislature on Wednesday approved a compromise plan to maintain state health coverage for more than 30,000 vulnerable adults.5:20 p.m.
  • AG Lori SwansonSwanson in the spotlight over health care challenge
    Minnesota Republicans are pressuring Attorney General Lori Swanson, a Democrat, to file suit challenging the new health care reform law. Swanson is running for re-election this year, and the GOP wants this issue to put that race at the forefront.5:24 p.m.
  • Minnesota reading test scores show achievement gap persists
    New test scores show Minnesota students are still above the national average in reading, but there's still a wide gap between how well white students perform compared with students of color.5:50 p.m.
  • Atom EgoyanFilm director Atom Egoyan examines infidelity
    Canadian film director Atom Egoyan is internationally acclaimed for his edgy movies, which explore the intricacies of human relationships. His new film "Chloe" presents some curious, and at times graphic, twists on marital infidelity.5:53 p.m.
  • The next mortgage mess approaches
    We've worried for months now about the next wave of mortgage problems. People who watch this stuff closely say it's approaching. While it won't be as bad as the wave of delinquencies and foreclosures that crippled home values the past two years, it will still hurt. There's some evidence it may land particularly hard on parts of central Minnesota and some of the Twin Cities far suburbs.6:15 p.m.
  • Lynne Rossetto KasperLynne Rossetto Kasper on our shifting cuisine culture
    Lynne Rossetto Kasper, host of The Splendid Table from American Public Media, joined All Things Considered to share some tips for parents of picky eaters.6:24 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • At U.S.-Mexico Summit, A New Take On Drug War
    A high-level mission to Mexico on Tuesday highlighted a new U.S. take on Mexico's drug war. For decades, Mexico has insisted that the U.S. must reduce its appetite for narcotics. On Tuesday, the U.S. government responded to Mexico: Yes, we can, and we should. Robert Siegel talks to Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, who was in Mexico on Tuesday.
  • U.S., Pakistan Vow Broader Cooperation
    Senior officials from Pakistan are in Washington for wide-ranging talks with Secretary of State Clinton and her colleagues. The two-day meeting is aimed at increasing U.S.-Pakistan cooperation on security, an eventual U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, U.S. military and economic aid, nuclear energy, education and more.
  • Sikhs Regain Right To Wear Turbans In U.S. Army
    Sikhs used to serve in the Army while observing their religion's requirements for wearing turbans and not shaving their hair and beards. But in 1984, the Army said they couldn't. This week, the Army reversed course — and U.S. Army Capt. Tejdeep Singh Rattan became the first American Sikh officer in the Army in more than 25 years.
  • Census Uses Online Map To Track The Count
    The Census Bureau on Wednesday unveiled a new Web site where people can follow response to the census. The tool was developed with the help of Google Maps, and it allows you to compare data from different cities.
  • Museum's New Acquisition: The 'At' Sign
    You can find a new addition to the Museum of Modern Art's collection in New York right on your computer keyboard. The museum says it has acquired the "at" sign for its department of architecture and design. Senior curator Paola Antonelli explains the acquisition to Melissa Block.
  • C-Section Births At All-Time High
    A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that cesarean births are at an all-time high in the U.S. Thirty-two percent of all births are delivered by cesarean section. Melissa Block talks to Dr. Caroline Signore, an obstetrician-gynecologist with the Pregnancy and Perinatology Branch at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, about what's behind the increase in c-sections.
  • Infants Recognize Voices, Emotions By 7 Months
    A new study shows that between the ages of 4 and 7 months, children's brains begin to respond to voices and emotions in an increasingly "adult" way. By tracking these changes scientists may be able to find new ways to diagnose early developmental problems, like autism.
  • L.A. County Jails Releasing Some Inmates Early
    Over the past three months 350 inmates from the Los Angeles County Jail were released before serving their full sentences. Sheriff Lee Baca says budget shortfalls are to blame. Some worry, however, that inmates released early will return to a life of crime.
  • In New Serial Thriller, Everyone's Hands Are Bloody
    Written by 22 authors, originally released as an audio book, and now available in hardcover, Watchlist is a thriller that takes wild twists and stylistic departures each time a new author takes control of the narrative.
  • Remembering Harmonica Great Jerry Adler
    Robert Siegel remembers harmonica player Jerry Adler, who died earlier this month at age 91, in Florida. Adler played on several other movie soundtracks, including Shane, High Noon and Mary Poppins.

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