All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Thursday, February 4, 2010

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Art HoundsArt Hounds
    Each week Minnesota Public Radio News asks three people from the Minnesota arts scene to be "Art Hounds." Their job is to step outside their own work and hunt down something exciting that's going on in local arts.4:44 p.m.
  • Dr. Andrew WakefieldWhat are the effects of the retracted autism study?
    The doctor behind a controversial study which linked the Measles-Mumps-Rubella vaccine to autism has been called "a dishonest, irresponsible doctor" by the General Medical Council, a British review board, and journal that originally published the study in 1998 has now retracted it.4:49 p.m.
  • Speaker opens the sessionDems open session with borrowing plan, health care cuts
    DFL leaders marked the opening of the 2010 session by unveiling a $1 billion bonding bill that they want to pass quickly. They also advanced a plan to provide health care coverage to the poor.5:19 p.m.
  • MPR headquartersMPR lawsuit third against Central Corridor project
    Minnesota Public Radio filed suit Thursday against the Metropolitan Council over the Central Corridor light rail project, claiming the Met Council is not living up to the noise mitigation agreement the two parties reached in April 2009.5:24 p.m.
  • Red BullsKline optimistic Red Bulls will receive overdue pay soon
    Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., is optimistic that 2,500 Minnesota soldiers who have been waiting three years for $10 million in bonus pay will receive their overdue compensation soon.5:38 p.m.
  • 3M incinerator in Cottage GroveNew 3M plan: little pollution, much resistance
    Residents in Cottage Grove are once again at odds with 3M over waste chemical concerns--even though the company's new enterprise would produce little change in pollution levels.5:53 p.m.
  • Dr. Andrew WakefieldWhat are the effects of the retracted autism study?
    The doctor behind a controversial study which linked the Measles-Mumps-Rubella vaccine to autism has been called "a dishonest, irresponsible doctor" by the General Medical Council, a British review board, and journal that originally published the study in 1998 has now retracted it.6:20 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • U.S. To Probe Prius Brake Problems
    The U.S. Transportation Department said Thursday it has received more than 100 complaints from owners of the 2010 Toyota Prius and has opened an investigation into possible brake problems with the model. That's more bad news for Toyota, which has recalled more than 5 million vehicles of various models to repair problems with sudden acceleration.
  • Training Begins For Toyota Mechanics
    Training sessions got under way in Connecticut on Thursday for Toyota mechanics who need to know how to repair the cars' accelerator pedals. Toyota ran three shifts of training at Gateway Community College in hopes of teaching as many mechanics as possible in the wake of problems with sudden acceleration that have led to more than 5 million Toyota vehicles being recalled.
  • Compensation Czar: Contracts Mandate AIG Bonuses
    Kenneth Feinberg, the Obama administration's compensation czar, says though he is personally "not pleased" with insurance giant AIG's decision to award $100 million in bonuses to it financial products division, the contracts for the awards were entered into when the economic climate was different. The division was largely responsible for the company's risky investments that forced a U.S. government bailout.
  • Using Haiku, Sun CEO Resigns On Twitter
    Sun Microsystems CEO Jonathan Schwartz resigned Thursday in an unusual way: He sent out a message on Twitter. Not only did he keep it under 140 characters, he did it in haiku. His Tweet: Financial crisis/Stalled too many customers/CEO no more.
  • McChrystal: Afghanistan No Longer 'Deteriorating'
    The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan says the security situation in the country remains serious, but is no longer "deteriorating." Gen. Stanley McChrystal was speaking to reporters on the sidelines of a NATO meeting in Istanbul.
  • Don't Ask, Don't Tell Hits Home For Marine
    One U.S. Marine in Afghanistan's Helmand Province has a unique perspective on the Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy. Zach Zimmerman's father is gay, and he has mixed feelings about changing the rules.
  • Marines On Military's Ban On Gays
    The Pentagon is beginning a year-long study to see what it would take to implement changes to the Don't Ask, Don't Tell law. Marines near North Carolina's Camp Lejeune share their views on the possibility of serving with openly gay troops. Most are tight-lipped.
  • Behind The Weather: Strongest El Nino In A Decade
    Heavy rains in California, record snowfalls in the mid-Atlantic and fires in Indonesia are all being attributed to the phenomenon. Government meteorologists say the effects of the most powerful El Nino since 1997-98 will very likely persist for another month or two.
  • Difficulties In Rebuilding Haiti's Economy
    Haiti barely had a functioning economy even before last month's deadly earthquake. Almost entirely dependent on a small textile industry and remittances from Haitian exiles, it was also captive to the often-clashing interests of multinational development banks and aid agencies.
  • American Missionaries Charged In Haiti
    Ten Americans held in Haiti for trying to take 33 children out of the country after last month's deadly earthquake were charged Thursday with child kidnapping. The group appeared in court before being taken to a jail in Haiti's capital, Port-au-Prince.

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