All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Collared mooseWhy are Minn. moose dying? Answer sought in Voyageurs Park
    Researchers have attached GPS collars to moose in Voyageurs National Park in an effort to help determine why so many are dying in the region. The study focuses on how climate change affects moose behavior and how moose use habitat to avoid warm temperatures.3:49 p.m.
  • Penumbra Theatre CompanyCulturally specific theaters face funding challenges
    Culturally specific theaters historically are at a disadvantage when it comes to maintaining fiscal stability.3:54 p.m.
  • Dr. Jon HallbergAsk Dr. Hallberg: After hospital discharge, many patients ultimately return
    At least 1 in 10 patients are readmitted after a hospital stay. As more hospitals are rated on their readmissions, the current issue of JAMA is focused on their prevention. ATC medical analyst Dr. Jon Hallberg talks about the factors that lead to return hospital stays, and what could change to decrease their occurrence.4:48 p.m.
  • Governor's budgetDayton and GOP clash over fairness of tax plan
    Republicans in the Minnesota Legislature blasted the Gov. Mark Dayton's budget plan today because they say it would force middle income Minnesotans to pay more in sales taxes. Dayton disputes the claim and says that by lowering property taxes and the sales tax rate he is creating a fair playing field for all Minnesotans.5:20 p.m.
  • Mille Lacs LakeWalleye decline prompts harvest cuts in Mille Lacs
    It's going to be a little harder to keep fish at one of the state's most popular fishing spots this year. Concern about walleye in Lake Mille Lacs where the population is at its lowest level in decades has prompted regulators to cut the total amount of walleye that can be taken from the lake. It's a measure aimed to balance the needs of the lake's ecosystem and the region's economy.5:24 p.m.
  • Collared mooseWhy are Minn. moose dying? Answer sought in Voyageurs Park
    Researchers have attached GPS collars to moose in Voyageurs National Park in an effort to help determine why so many are dying in the region. The study focuses on how climate change affects moose behavior and how moose use habitat to avoid warm temperatures.5:50 p.m.
  • Penumbra Theatre CompanyCulturally specific theaters face funding challenges
    Culturally specific theaters historically are at a disadvantage when it comes to maintaining fiscal stability.5:55 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Egypt's Military Chief Warns That Protests Could Lead To Collapse Of The State
    Egypt's Defense Minister has warned that the country is on the brink of collapse amid continued rioting and clashes between police and protesters in several major cities. More than 50 people have died over the past four days, most of them in Port Said, at the northern end of the Suez Canal.
  • U.S. May Build Base For Drones In Northwest Africa
    The United States is looking to base surveillance drones in the African nation of Niger. The base there will allow the U.S. unmanned vehicles to conduct operations in northern Africa, including in Mali, where France has intervened to fight Islamist militants. Tom Bowman talks to Melissa Block about the latest on the increasing U.S. military role in Africa.
  • Clinton Takes Final World Trek With Virtual Townhall
    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had been hoping to take an around the world trip as she wraps up her time as secretary of state. But recent health troubles grounded her. Instead she bid farewell by taking questions from around the world in a "Global Townterview" at the Newseum on Tuesday.
  • Sand After Sandy: Scientists Map Seafloor For Sediment
    On the deck of a 27-foot boat off the shore of Long Island, researchers are using sonar to study the sand and sediment that washed away from the system of protective barrier islands and beaches by Hurricane Sandy.
  • Illegal Immigration Into U.S. Slows At Borders
    Securing the border is a key element of the Senate's immigration overhaul proposal. Ted Robbins talks to Audie Cornish about the billions already spent on existing security measures and whether they are effective.
  • 'E-Verify' Background Check Program A Likely Part Of Any Immigration Reform
    Any new immigration legislation is likely to expand the E-Verify program as a key component of enforcement. Some businesses already use the program to confirm that their new hires are authorized to work. But E-Verify has been error-prone in the past. Audie Cornish talks with Muzaffar Chishti of the non-partisan Migration Policy Institute about how the program has evolved and what it will take to expand it nationwide.
  • For Your Next Caribbean Vacation, Haiti ... Maybe?
    Haiti is trying to sell itself as an international vacation hub in a bid to revive its once-vibrant tourism industry. Officials say tourism could be a major driver of economic growth and help lift Haitians out of poverty.
  • Scientists Discover Dung Beetles Use The Milky Way For GPS
    A team of scientists has discovered that dung beetles climb on dung balls and dance around in circles before taking off. This dance is not one of joy, however — the insects are checking out the sky to get their bearings. Melissa Block and Audie Cornish have more.
  • Stefan Kudelski, Who Made Sound Recording Portable, Dies
    Stefan Kudelski, inventor of the first portable professional sound recorder, has died. His Nagra tape recorder, created in 1951, revolutionized film by giving filmmakers the freedom to record scenes at virtually any location.
  • President Obama Renews Push For Immigration Reform, Praises Bipartisan Plan
    President Obama was in Las Vegas on Tuesday, where he outlined his goals for immigration reform.

Program Archive
  
January 2013
S M T W T F S
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31    
  

MPR News
Radio

Listen Now

Other Radio Streams from MPR

Classical MPR
Radio Heartland
Win Your Dinner Party

The Dinner Party Download™

A fast, funny digest of the week's most interesting news, cuisine, cocktails and culture.

Services