All Things Considered
All Things Considered
Tuesday, January 8, 2013

Minnesota Public Radio Stories

  • Minnesota WildNHL deal could help Wild become profitable
    For the Minnesota Wild and other struggling National Hockey League teams, a collective bargaining agreement reached over the weekend offers an opportunity to return to profitability.3:20 p.m.
  • TCF BankTCF Bank notifies Iranian students of account closures
    A group of Iranian students at the University of Minnesota suspects TCF Bank was discriminating against them when it told them it would close their accounts at the end of this month. The move comes amid tightened U.S. sanctions against Iran. But the students say they have not violated any financial restrictions.3:24 p.m.
  • Permanent storage of nuclear waste still in limbo
    Thirty years ago this week the Nuclear Waste Policy Act became law, committing the federal government to finding a permanent storage facility for the nation's nuclear waste.4:49 p.m.
  • Crowne Plaza HotelMille Lacs Band looks to purchase 2 hotels in St. Paul
    The Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe announced plans Tuesday to purchase two hotels in downtown St. Paul. If the deal goes through, it will give the bands ownership of nearly half of the capital city's downtown hotel rooms.4:55 p.m.
  • Foung HawjDFL in control as legislative session begins
    The Minnesota Legislature dropped the gavel Tuesday on a new session and a new order, with Democrats in full control for the first time in a generation.5:16 p.m.
  • Minnesota WildNHL deal could help Wild become profitable
    For the Minnesota Wild and other struggling National Hockey League teams, a collective bargaining agreement reached over the weekend offers an opportunity to return to profitability.5:20 p.m.
  • TCF BankTCF Bank notifies Iranian students of account closures
    A group of Iranian students at the University of Minnesota suspects TCF Bank was discriminating against them when it told them it would close their accounts at the end of this month. The move comes amid tightened U.S. sanctions against Iran. But the students say they have not violated any financial restrictions.5:50 p.m.

National Public Radio Stories

  • Nationwide Efforts To Curb Gun Violence Begin To Gain Steam
    In the wake of the school shooting in Newtown, Conn., President Obama asked Vice President Joe Biden to pull together a group to review policy options and make recommendations within the month. That deadline is coming right up. Mara Liasson joins Audie Cornish to talk about the vice president's initiative and others.
  • Gun Control Advocates Say ATF's Hands Have Been Tied
    The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives is the primary enforcer of the nation's gun laws, but advocates and former ATF officials say agents face legal restrictions that limit their effectiveness. In addition, the agency has been without a permanent director for years.
  • A Dash Of Olive Oil May Preserve British Cathedral
    One of the world's most basic cooking ingredients could be the key to protecting some of Europe's most stunning buildings. The limestone used in England's 800-year-old York Minster is particularly vulnerable to pollution. The oleic acid in olive oil, British researchers say, may provide the protective coating needed to prevent further decay.
  • 2012 Smashes Record For Hottest Year In The Lower 48
    It's official: 2012 was the hottest year on record for the contiguous United States. In fact, it shattered the record set in 1998. The National Climatic Data Center says last year was also extraordinarily dry — and drought conditions are persisting into 2013.
  • Workshops Help Families Grappling With Alzheimer's Home Care
    With most of the more than 5 million people with Alzheimer's cared for at home, the nation's largest provider of nonmedical senior home care now offers free training workshops for family caregivers. Caregivers are taught how to make use of long-term memories and to recognize what triggers anxiety.
  • Syrian Refugees Attack Aid Workers Amid Deteriorating Conditions
    Cold rain, heavy winds and crowded conditions at a camp for Syrian refugees in Jordan led to a riot on Tuesday. Several aid workers were injured at the Zaatari camp — as Dale Gavlak of the Associated Press tells Melissa Block.
  • A Welcoming Way Station For Syrians Fleeing Home
    Part hostel, part performance center, a house in southern Turkey has become a valuable place for Syrians fleeing their homeland and seeking temporary refuge.
  • 'What It Takes' Author Remembered As An Engrossing Figure
    Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Richard Ben Cramer has died. He covered politics and the Middle East for The Baltimore Sun and The Philadelphia Inquirer. Cramer wrote the book What It Takes, about the 1988 presidential campaign and one of the defining treatments of American presidential politics.
  • Despite Censorship, Mali's Musicians Play On
    Last year in Mali, militants linked to al-Qaida took control of the northern part of the country. They have banned all music except for Quranic verse — but some artists are finding ways to fight back.
  • Elvis Left The Building Long Ago, But His Food (And Music) Lives On
    Presley's legendary love for peanut butter and bananas and bacon helped lead to his outsized body toward the end of his life, and a lasting food legacy. And, oh yeah, he could sing too.

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