Countdown: The Top 13 Creepy Classics

October 31, 2013
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ST. PAUL, Minn. — There are certain pieces of music that can send chills up our spines or make our hair stand on end. Sometimes it was the intent of the composer to write a scary-sounding piece; other times, the fright factor derives from an association we have with the music, as can happen with the score for a scary film.

We all react to the music in different ways, and that's why we asked you for your help in choosing the "Creepy Classics." And you responded in droves, and now it's time to find out how things landed.

During the day of October 31, 2013, we'll reveal the top Creepy Classics. Starting at 9 a.m., we'll count down the top 13 scariest pieces of classical as voted on by the Classical MPR audience, revealing a new piece about every hour. We'll skip 1-3 p.m. for Performance Today, and we'll make up the lost time with a top 5 countdown at 7 p.m. with Bill Morelock.

Grab some candy, and behold the shocking results below, which will update automatically starting at 9 a.m. (You may need to refresh your browser to see the latest results.)

1. Mussorgsky: Night on Bald Mountain

2. Saint-Saens: Danse Macabre

3. Bach: Toccata and Fugue in d minor

4. Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique (March to the Scaffold and Witches' Sabbath)

5. Grieg: Hall of the Mountain King

6. Herrmann: Psycho Film Music

7. Williams: Harry Potter Film Music

8. Mozart: Don Giovanni (Final Scene)

9. Dukas: Sorcerer's Apprentice

10. Gounod: Funeral March of a Marionette

11. Schubert: Der Erlkonig

12. Chopin: Piano Sonata No. 2: Funeral March and Finale

13. Rachmaninoff: Isle of the Dead

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Melissa Ousley
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