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Visual Arts

  • A photographer, a writer and a mysterious recluse collaborate on story about running away
    A new book, "The House of Coates," is a lavish, spiral-bound book illustrated with photos of places on the edge of society. The principal collaborators disavow authorships of the photos, but instead point to a mysterious recluse.March 23, 2012
  • Lost mural by Leonardo may have been discovered
    Researchers may have discovered traces of a lost mural by Leonardo da Vinci by poking a probe through cracks in a 16th-century fresco painted on the wall of one of Florence's most famous buildings.March 12, 2012
  • Photographer Chris Jordan qualifies the quantitative
    When we casually toss around words like millions and billions in conversation, it's difficult to visualize what those numbers actually represent. It's a challenge which for years has motivated photographer Chris Jordan.January 26, 2012
  • Large-format photos come to life on small screen
    Famed for her large, sumptuous photographs which hang in art museums around the world, JoAnn Verburg is trying something much smaller.December 13, 2011
  • The hidden messages of a Renaissance master
    Considered one of the greats of his time, Renaissance artist Albrecht Durer created iconic engravings and woodcuts in the late 15th and early 16th centuries. It turns out the story behind the collection is as fascinating as the pictures themselves.October 14, 2011
  • Norma Lyon, Iowa fair's 'butter cow lady,' dies
    Norma "Duffy" Lyon, whose life-size butter sculptures delighted Iowa state fairgoers for nearly half a century, has died. She was 81. Lyon was interviewed by MPR in 2005.June 28, 2011
  • Artist presents 'Scattered Lights' at the Northern Spark arts festival
    Northern Spark is a 'nuit blanche' or white night festival, running from dusk till dawn. It will feature hundreds of artists: performers, sculptors, and a host of others all with work designed to be seen at night.June 3, 2011
  • Walker exhibit explores voyeurism as art
    Nowadays it seems cameras are everywhere and many people complain privacy is fast becoming a thing of the past. However a new exhibit at the Walker Art Center shows photographic invasions began not long after the invention of the camera itself.May 20, 2011
  • Dashing war documentarian killed in Libya
    Tim Hetherington lived to bring the viewer painfully close to the raw and terrible truths of battle. That's how he died on Wednesday.April 20, 2011
  • Birder aims to revolutionize nature guides
    Richard Crossley wants to revolutionize birding. The British author has developed the Crossley ID Guide. Instead of having one picture of each bird, it presents multiple images taken from different distances and angles in carefully designed photo spreads.March 8, 2011
  • Steelroots sculpture show born of many challenges
    "Steelroots: Touching the Earth and Sky" doesn't officially open at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum in Chanhassen until mid-April. However the 16 sculptures are already in place, and on view.March 8, 2011
  • Titian, Veronese works come to Mpls. Institute of Arts
    A treasure trove of Renaissance Venetian painting opens at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts this weekend.February 3, 2011
  • The Mourners arrive in Mpls. from the 15th century
    A group of foreign dignitaries arrives at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts this weekend. They're called "The Mourners" They are some three dozen alabaster figures carved for the tomb of a 15th century French Duke. The statues have caused a sensation at other stops on their U.S. tour.January 21, 2011
  • In new book, photographer Leo Kim searches for peace in St. Paul
    Some prominent St. Paul residents say photographer Leo Kim has captured a sense of place about the city they love -- St. Paul. It's a surprising feat for a man who has spent most of his life looking for a place to call home.January 18, 2011
  • A photographer's search for the elusive 'unguarded moment'
    The photographer best known for the arresting image of a young Afghan girl that appeared on the cover of National Geographic in 1985 joins Midmorning to talk about his work, his innate curiosity about the world, and how he chose to use the last roll of Kodachrome film.Midmorning, October 1, 2010

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