Dayton: New budget talks unlikely until Tuesday

Posted at 3:20 PM on July 1, 2011 by Paul Tosto (20 Comments)

Don't expect the state budget impasse to end this weekend.

Gov. Mark Dayton says while he's willing to meet over the next few days with Republican legislative leaders, negotiators need a "breather." He expects to begin reaching out on Tuesday, after the July 4 holiday, to Republican and DFL lawmakers.

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His comments came during a taped interview this afternoon with Tom Crann, host of MPR's All Things Considered. Portions of the interview will be aired later today during the show.

Asked about when talks might happen next, Dayton said, "We're going to take a brief pause over the holiday weekend -- although there'll be some individual conversations going on -- and then begin Tuesday right away to reach out to Republican legislators, DFL legislators, anyone who has a suggestion for how we can get this resolved."

Budget talks between Dayton and Republican leaders broke down late Thursday night, leading to a shutdown of most state government operations that began today.

Asked why wait until Tuesday, Dayton said negotiators had met around the clock for eight days straight and, "Sometimes you just need a little bit of a breather... Things ended on harsh note last night and I think people are in more need of at least a good night's sleep than another round of haranguing."

The urgency of the situation "is very apparent to all of us," he added. "If there's anything that can be done this weekend that I'm aware of, believe me I will do it ... Otherwise, we'll get back at it and work as hard and as fast as possible to get this resolved."

Here's the interview.

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Comments (20)

I agree with Governor Dayton.

Posted by Ginny | July 1, 2011 3:45 PM


I am a State of MN employee. I agree with not talking away from the poor and holding tight to tax the 2 % that the millionaires save with having that kind of money in their bank. Help the disabled,elderly and the poor.. That's where the value is in the dollar.

Posted by Willa Lavamaki | July 1, 2011 3:49 PM


If the legislature had not wasted WEEKS of debate over the "Definition of Marriage" amendment referendum, we may not have been in this conundrum. I urge everyone to vote NO on the marriage amendment in 2012, and take a long hard look at who you vote to represent you going forward.

Posted by Meredith Black | July 1, 2011 3:53 PM


I agree with Willa. Stunned that the Republicans hold the state hostage to protect millionaires.

Posted by Ginny | July 1, 2011 3:54 PM


11:35am today on MPR's Midday: Speaker Zellers repeatedly called Minority Leader Thissen a liar for saying that GOP's push of social policy issues derailed budget agreement. Host Eichten gave Zellers several opportunities to back down; would not do so. Zellers is the liar on this.

Posted by Gary | July 1, 2011 4:03 PM


I have been impressed by Governor Dayton's conviction and compassion. Those "family values" Republicans are a disgrace. And so is former Gov Pawlenty. How dare he cheer on a state shut down. What a creepy party the GOP has become.

Posted by Nancy | July 1, 2011 4:28 PM


"Tax the rich, just don't call me rich." seems to be the philosophy.

When are we going to start expecting people to carry their own weight?

I wonder how many rich people want to move to Sioux Falls where the income tax is 0%? They don't call them bad names or use them to fix the problems in their budget to protect the free money liberals want to give to deadbeats.

Posted by Josh | July 1, 2011 4:38 PM


A stand for the protection of people's needs: a moral position by Dayton that I support.

Posted by Matthew | July 1, 2011 4:42 PM


I think the point Gov. Dayton is that the millionaires should pay the same percentage as the middle class do in taxes. What part of that is unfair? If those who make over 500K a year don't agree they always can move to a state that charges less income tax. But they won't enjoy what they've come to expect in Minnesota. The old adage is true you get what you pay for.

Posted by John D. | July 1, 2011 4:59 PM


I think given what has been going on in the
capitol the past few days, one thing is clear;
The budget is still not being taken serious by
either party. The nerve of throwing redistricting
and other self serving issues into last minute
negotiations, I think is self serving for a chosen few at the expense of the rest of the Minnesotans, Also snipping the cord on a
last ditch effort for a lights on policy to keep things going through the weekend in order for
a little breather to finish the remaining tweaks on the budget was also very dissapointing. In the end Minnesota suffers.
Everyone at the Capitol- WAKE UP.
Instead of being self serving and selfish.
DO WHAT YOU ARE PAID TO DO.
Keep to the mechanics of the budget, and leave idealogy out of it.

Posted by Ben | July 1, 2011 5:03 PM


Ben, you are mistaken. Read above or listen to the reports for why Dayton rejected the notion of a "lights-on" temporary solution. Part of why he rejected it is because it has cost the state a lot to prepare for the sutdown. If they had a lights-on thing, they'd have to go through it all over again; there were no indications of Republicans doing what they should do: compromise, and make the rich pay their fair share of taxes.

They need to be forced to compromise. A shutdown might do that. I didn't hear Dayton say that, but that's what I think.

Posted by Jamie | July 1, 2011 5:54 PM


Last November, Republicans campaigned on "jobs, jobs, jobs." I doubt many voters understood the depth of that deception.

Today we can see that, while the Republican agenda includes a few hard core social and political issues (such as abortion, school vouchers, marriage discrimination and voter ID), the GOP's main concern is financial protection for a very small group of very rich people.

Jobs don't really figure into Republican thinking, and 98% percent of Minnesotans are now unrepresented in the Legislature. But all this is the result of choices made in 2010. Perhaps we'll be more careful with our votes in 2012.

Posted by Ralph Crammedin | July 1, 2011 5:55 PM


Josh: How does a 78-year-old woman with multiple health issues "carry her own weight"? How does a severely mentally ill man "carry his own weight"? How does a toddler with cerebral palsey "carry his own weight"? How seriously depressed does your 82-year-old grandmother get when she has to move into a nursing home (costing the state more money in the long run, by the way) because there's no assistance for her to stay in her own home?

You also apparently believe the Republican-generated myth about wealthy people moving to other states when they have to pay more taxes. Research shows that that is just not true. And you know what? If there's a millionaire here who wants to move to South Dakota because he has to pay another $1000 in taxes. I'm happy to see him go.

Posted by Jamie | July 1, 2011 6:06 PM


//"the GOP's main concern is financial protection for a very small group of very rich people."//

Exactly, Ralph.

Republicans always claim that tax increases on the wealthy hurts job creation, and that tax cuts help to create jobs. So where are all the jobs that should have been created with the state and federal tax cuts of the last 12 years?

It's just a line of spin they've come up with to justify their catering to their rich friends and donors.

Posted by Jamie | July 1, 2011 6:13 PM


I am also a State of Minnesota employee and I disagree with Dayton. The legislature passed the largest budget in state history, 12% over last year. We could be working right now if the governor was willing to agree to a continuing resolution, but he is more interested in political leverage.

Posted by David | July 1, 2011 6:23 PM


While it wont fix this current problem we find ourselves in because of the extreme views of both democrats and republicans, the real long term solution to this problem is to have legislative districts that are more competitive. Instead of a safe repulican or dfl districts where each party can run the most extreme candidate they can find and still win because the district was designed to give one party an easy victory, we need districts that encourage the parties to run middle-of-the-road candidtates who more accurately represent the whole of the districts they are elected from instead of the extremes of each party.

Of course the people who are charged with redistricting are the extreme legislators that are currently elected who are really more concerned with their own reelection than with the people who they represent.

Posted by James | July 2, 2011 2:00 AM


The comments so far seem to reflect the following attitudes:
The government is responsible for taking care of everyone.
Individuals are not empowered to look after or help neighbors and friends. See attitude #1
The government needs more money, i.e. taxes. See attitude #1
The government needs to spend more money and not consider reducing the scope of what the government needs to do. See attitude #1
May peace and calm prevail.

Posted by Ben Van Sant | July 2, 2011 11:07 AM


Has the motto moved?
As Minnesota goes, so goes the nation.

Delaware

Posted by Wee Geordie | July 2, 2011 2:26 PM


Many years ago Supreme Court Justice Holmes said, ” Taxes are the price of Democracy. Umfortuntly the price is high”.

After eight years of Tim Pawlenty's "austerity budgets" it's going to cost even more. In the 1950's the tax rates were double what they are now and things were pretty good then. Most businesses reinvested in their business rather than take the money as personal income.

Figure it out legislators. Get the budget done and quit blaming the Governor. He seems to be the only with some good ideas these days!

Posted by John Degner | July 3, 2011 9:15 AM


If you don't have enough money, why is it "fair" to take the money you need from someone else who has plenty of money? If Bill Gates lived in Minnesota would it be fair to pass a special Gates tax for the $1.8 billion in order to solve this budget problem? I'm sure General Mills or 3M could come up with a couple of billion. How about levying a special tax on a couple of big corporations? Would that be fair?

Posted by Gibson | July 3, 2011 3:47 PM


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