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Category Archive: Reviews

What the Critics Say: Pet Shop Boys at the Proms

Posted at 3:30 PM on July 24, 2014 by Luke Taylor (0 Comments)
Filed under: Concerts, In the media, Reviews


Pet Shop Boys: Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe (photo by John Wright).

Perhaps best known as electro-pop duo Pet Shop Boys, Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe made their Proms debut as composers on Wednesday, July 23.

The BBC Proms, largely known as the world's greatest classical music festival, runs July 18 to Sept. 13, with concerts every day at the Royal Albert Hall in London and in other venues around the UK and Northern Ireland. (Classical MPR will begin broadcasting highlights of the Proms on Sept. 1, leading up to the Last Night of the Proms on Sept. 13.)

Tennant and Lowe's work, A Man from the Future, is a look at the life of Alan Turing, a cryptographer in World War II and a pioneering computer scientist whose work helped make possible the medium in which you're reading this right now. In 1952, a time when homosexuality was illegal, Turing was prosecuted for being gay; he received a posthumous pardon in 2013.

"Turing was way ahead of his time in the realms of both technology and sexuality," remarked Tennant and Lowe in a statement ahead of Wednesday's concert. "His open expression of his homosexuality was astonishingly brave and forward-looking at a time when gay men were relentlessly persecuted by the government."

The Proms concert featured Tennant and Low, as well as Chrissie Hynde (the Pretenders) on vocals, as well as the BBC Singers and the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Dominic Wheeler. Actress Juliet Stevenson — whom you may recognize from her role as the mother to Keira Knightley's character in Bend It Like Beckham — provided narration.

Enjoying a Proms premiere is one more accomplishment for Pet Shop Boys, who have also scored films and composed for ballet and musicals. "This is proof of why these two gentlemen are more than just an '80s throwback synth-pop band," says Jake Rudh, host of Transmission on Classical MPR's sister station, The Current.

In the wake of the premiere, reviews of the concert have been largely positive; here's a roundup:

Kitty Empire, The Guardian:


What are we to call A Man From the Future … A pop oratorio? A classical audiobiography?

His tale works as an operatic tragedy and this piece is extensively sung: by the BBC Singers, augmented by Neil Tennant … This tribute is lavishly orchestrated. The BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Dominic Wheeler, is doing the heavy lifting …

Turing's story is deeply affecting, and the telling of it by an establishment organisation (the BBC, which runs the Proms) in an establishment venue (the Royal Albert Hall) in an establishment idiom (classical) is cause for celebration.

But we really could have done with more from Lowe, and modernity more widely. Turing was, after all, a man from The Future. Even given the operatic nature of his tale and the rarefied Proms setting, wrapping this man up in strings seems a contradictory impulse.

Nick Hasted, The Independent:


… Getting the tale of Turing's singular genius and representative tragedy across seems to outweigh the balance between words and music. "Conform, rebel or withdraw" are the choices the public schoolboy Turing is presented with, as ominous strings close in to cage him.

The remorseless glide of laptop-generated synth washes signal the machine-dreams which led him towards the computer's invention. The BBC Singers then give the sensation of a dying fall, as the backroom heroism which turned the U-boat tide at Bletchley Park is passed over in a sentence. Tennant and Lowe aren't interested in what Turing is belatedly honoured for now, but his shadow-life then.

Bursts of hot, frantic swing follow him mentioning his homosexuality, and the furious swell of the choir's baritones greet his downward spiral towards chemical castration by the state. His hot blood and mechanistic visions' merging is expressed in the orchestral-laptop score. It is always, though, subservient to the verbal tracing of Turing's fate.

John Aizlewood, Evening Standard:


The 45-minute extended song-suite had its clunky moments but it was joyously light on its musical feet, encompassing sublime Kraftwerkian wonder, the sheer power of orchestra and choir at full pelt.

The sheer scale required to perform it may mean A Man from the Future is consigned to history. Let's hope not: it deserves better.

Adam Sweeting, The Telegraph:


Who knows what the appropriate term would be to describe A Man From the Future … The text combined his scientific brilliance with the outspokenly gay sexuality that cost him dearly in the censorious Fifties.

Musically, the piece skilfully blended orchestral writing with shifting electronic layers, masterminded by a suitably enigmatic Chris Lowe. Turing's fascination with a "universal machine" was evoked by a slice of dreamy electronica, though elsewhere there were witty interpolations of Fifties-style sci-fi effects or dark string passages.

Orchestrator Sven Helbig conjured a dazzling spectrum of colours from the orchestra and the BBC Choir, although powerful melodic ideas seemed thin on the ground. Whether including a recording of Gordon Brown's apology for Turing's appalling treatment (which included chemical castration), will enhance its box-office appeal, I wouldn't like to say.

Neil Smith, BBC News:


Divided into eight sections, the Pet Shop Boys' ambitious, sometimes atonal work marked a departure from such radio-friendly tracks as It's a Sin and West End Girls.

Yet it still contained elements of the group's recognisable computerised sound, alongside contributions from an 18-member chamber choir.

Now that you've read what the critics have said, you can listen to the music for yourself. BBC Radio 3 has made this Prom available for listening for 30 days. Launch the BBC iPlayer via this link.

Classical MPR will highlight performances from the Proms starting Sept. 1, leading up to the Last Night of the Proms on Sept. 13; listen for those Proms highlights each day at 10 a.m. and at 10 p.m. CDT on Classical MPR.

(0 Comments)

Criticizing the Critics

Posted at 3:36 PM on May 21, 2014 by Rex Levang
Filed under: In the media, Opera, Reviews


Mezzo-soprano Tara Erraught (photo courtesy IMG Artists)

Here's the story that's been tearing up the Internet in the last day or so — at least in the classical music department. It even shows up on the News Cut blog from MPR's Bob Collins.

The Irish singer Tara Erraught recently appeared in the title role of the opera Der Rosenkavalier. As Bob notes, "five different male writers used stocky, chubby, puppy-fat, scullery maid, unsightly, and unappealing to describe her 'performance.'"

Did the critics cross a line? Were their editors asleep at the switch? Would a male singer have been treated differently?

As this summary in The Telegraph suggests, opera singers, music writers, and the opera-loving public have not been slow to join the debate.

What do you think? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

Choral CD Chronicles: Vol. 1 - Lorelei Ensemble Was The Best Valentine's Day Present EVER

Posted at 6:00 AM on February 20, 2014 by Tesfa Wondemagegnehu (1 Comments)
Filed under: Choral Music, Reviews

lorelei composite cropped.png On Valentine's Day I decided to attend a choral concert with friends (I know, I know...this reeks of total choral geekery). I must admit, after hearing the Lorelei Ensemble absolutely nail Steve Reich's Know What is Above You, I knew I made the right decision. I was going to sit at home, watch West Wing re-runs, cook a steak and call it a night. Instead, I got treated to a night of exhilarating music. This group of extraordinarily gifted women sing with such precision and passion that I couldn't help but be overwhelmed by their performance. Like a true choral nerd, I went home and bought their CD, Live. Know. Love. (BTW, brilliantly plugged on their part during the concert) and started my jam session.

First track I checked out was David Lang's I Live in Pain. They nailed this piece in the live performance and of course, the track on the CD was even hotter. Instead of skipping back to the beginning of the disc, I closed my eyes and I let it run...rolling the dice a bit, hoping for the best. After 25+ minutes of aural ecstasy, I found myself wanting more. They deliver eerie, breathtaking performances on every track; locking and spinning intricately woven dissonance with masterful intonation and grand artistry. This group gets my REAL DEAL stamp of approval! 

If you don't believe the hype, just check out these recordings (Concert Highlights):



This is definitely a CD worth checking out!


(1 Comments)

An 'Arabella' preview

Posted at 2:47 PM on November 8, 2013 by Julie Amacher
Filed under: Events, Opera, Reviews

Last night I sat in on the final dress rehearsal of the Minnesota Opera's production of Arabella by Richard Strauss. If you go, here are a few things you might notice. First of all, there is no overture to set the scene. Music Director Michael Christie walks into the pit, the oversized orchestra of 62 musicians plays a few notes, and the singers are off. This opera is an athletic feat of endurance, especially for Jacqueline Wagner, who plays the lead, and her betrothed Mandryka, sung by baritone Craig Irvin. These musicians are well-trained Olympians.

The composer intended this music to be a bit frenetic; however, the tension is relieved every time Arabella graces the stage. Wagner's elegance as an actor and her rich, velvety voice melts more than one suitor's heart. There is plenty of comic relief starting with Arabella's sister, Zdenka, sung by Elizabeth Futral. Zdenka was a wild child, so even as a young woman she dresses and behaves as a boy. She even proclaims, "I will be a boy until I die." However, she does discover her womanhood in Act II.

You'll also notice the detailed whitewashed set as the curtain goes up on Act I. The scene is a hotel in Vienna in the 1920s. As Arabella blossoms, so does the color on the stage, in the form of flowers, the Downton Abbey-styled costumes and the set itself.

One incredible highlight is the love duet in Act II between Arabella and Mandryka. Irvin and Wagner are beautifully matched; if you aren't moved by this duet, you don't have a pulse!

And because this was a press event, live tweeting was not only permitted, but encouraged. Here are some of the photos I live-tweeted from the rehearsal to give you a taste of the production: