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Click on Classical: Music to relax...or, to go on a violent vigilante spree through Chicago

Posted at 8:48 AM on August 25, 2014 by Jay Gabler
Filed under: Click on Classical

20140820_concordia_college 2.jpg

Every Monday morning, I join John Birge on Classical MPR to talk about a few of the stories we're featuring on our website. Here are the stories we'll be discussing today.

When she finishes her coursework for the day, says Concordia College music major Emily Feld, she turns on some classical music — but not the music you might expect. "What I look for is not something that will help me tune out and turn my brain off," she writes. "I need something that rekindles my passion for music, something that pulls me off the couch and back to the piano." Here are the pieces that keep Emily inspired.

Other classical musicians, when they close their instrument cases, like to get out into the wild. Gwen Hoberg asked some of her fellow musicians what they like to do to relax; their answers included yoga, knitting, running, and shooting.

We're also starting to feature some stories and interviews related to video game music — which is covered by Emily Reese in her Top Score podcast. This week, Garrett Tiedemann interviewed composer Brian Reitzell, who explained why writing video game music is like being a short-order cook.