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Classical Notes

Click on Classical: Tenor on TV, "Vexations" 'til dawn, and why you should support music you don't like

Posted at 8:23 AM on June 9, 2014 by Jay Gabler
Filed under: Click on Classical

Photo courtesy ABC

Bradley Wisk.jpg

Every Monday morning at 9:15, I join John Birge on Classical MPR to discuss the stories we're featuring on our website. Here's what we'll be talking about today.

Soprano Sharleen Joynt made a splash last season on ABC's The Bachelor, so opera fans were excited to see a tenor among the men competing for Andi Dorfman's heart on the new season of The Bachelorette​. Unlike Joynt, Bradley Wisk didn't hesitate to sing...and that might have helped to sink his stint on the show after just a few episodes. I recapped the drama.

Northern Spark is an all-night arts festival that will take place this year in Minneapolis on the night of June 14 — and classical music will be part of the mix. Specifically, Satie's Vexations will be played for a stretch of nine hours by nine different pianists at Northrop Auditorium. Read about how artists in Berlin and Mumbai will be interacting with this event in real time — and note Michael Barone's comment about what might have been the most recent local performance of this epic piece.

Should you support music you hate? In a compelling essay​, David Lindquist makes a case for why a little music that's not to your liking might turn out to be a very good thing for classical music as a whole.