On Now

Listen to the Stream
  • La Scala di Seta (Silken Ladder): Overture 3:32 Gioacchino Rossini
    Prague Sinfonia Orchestra
    Christian Benda
    Buy Now
  • The Queen's Jig 3:28 John Playford
    David Douglass, violin
    Paul O'Dette, lute
    Andrew Lawrence-King, harp
    Buy Now
Playlist
Other MPR Radio Streams
Choral Stream
MPR News
Radio Heartland

You can now listen to Classical and Choral Music on your iOS (iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad) or Android device.

Blog Archive

February 2011
S M T W T F S
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28          


Master Archive

Contact Us

Purchase the Music

  • Buy the music you've heard on-air! Your purchase helps support our classical service.
    ArkivMusic

Services

Classical Notes

Classical Notes: February 23, 2011 Archive

Learning to Listen at Classical MPR

Posted at 11:07 AM on February 23, 2011 by Emily Reese (7 Comments)
Filed under: Events

I can't tell you how often I meet someone who wants to learn more about classical music. Usually, this revelation stems from their discovery of where I work; and, more specifically, what I do for where I work.

After meeting a few hundred people (or so) who wish they knew more about classical music, I thought, "Let's teach them."

"Learning to Listen" was born. A series of six free classes over the course of four months, held here at Minnesota Public Radio in the Maud Moon Weyerhaeuser studio, led by hosts of Classical MPR. The first class is Tuesday, March 1st from 7-8:30 p.m.

It's an opportunity to fill in the gaps of your knowledge of classical music. And if you have no knowledge at all, come to the first session, listen, and learn.

Our first session (Tuesday, 3/1) starts at the beginning, or as close as we can come to it. For centuries, not much happened. But then the French started writing secular music and the Germans followed their lead. The musicians for Notre Dame Cathedral started taking more liberties with their sacred works. After a couple hundred years and a handful of historically significant events, the Reformation rocked Europe. Then the Church of England split (for the first time).

All of these events drastically changed the landscape and course of classical music, and as exciting as it is to discuss, it's even more exciting to hear. Come, listen, and learn.

The classes are free, but please register here in advance.

Comment on this post