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Classical Notes: October 17, 2007 Archive

Mozart at the Movies: Kenneth Branagh and The Magic Flute

Posted at 5:11 AM on October 17, 2007 by John Birge

On "The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson," keep an eye out for Ian McKellen tonight, having arrived in LA after his stint at the Guthrie.

Then on Friday, Ferguson's guest is Kenneth Branagh, who is making the rounds to promote his new movie of Mozart's opera The Magic Flute. It opens in Europe in December. I've not been able to confirm the US release date, but one would hope in time for the holidays.

Good luck finding that info (or anything else) at the film's website, which must be the most annoying website ever devised by man.

Judging by the trailer below, it's a quite different from the classic Ingmar Bergman treatment:



Emily Lodine: Back, in her own backyard

Posted at 6:00 AM on October 17, 2007 by John Birge

Mezzo-soprano Emily Lodine is back in the Twin Cities and Rochester this weekend, performing with Lyra Baroque.

This gig is close to home for Emily, who gave up city life years ago and married a Minnesota pig farmer. Their most unlikely match was profiled in a public television special earlier this year called "The Mystery of Love."

But Minnesota Public Radio was on top of the story years ago, in this profile from 1999.

Beethoven Gets Even

Posted at 4:58 PM on October 17, 2007 by Rex Levang
Filed under: Ludwig van Beethoven

Just in case you missed it on All Things Considered: Music critic Tom Manoff taking notice that the most famous Beethoven symphonies have the odd numbers (Beethoven's Fifth, Beethoven's Ninth..), and the "neglected" ones, the even.

Actually, in the case of Beethoven, they're all famous--but the even numbers may be slightly less so. The full story here.