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Classical Notes: April 4, 2006 Archive

Mikey Likes It--classical music, that is

Posted at 9:05 AM on April 4, 2006 by John Zech
Filed under: The blog

The Pioneer Press had a nice story on Sunday about Wisconsin's art educator of the year, John Jaskot. He feels "art educates the whole child." To quiet their minds while the kids do art he turns on MPR's classical music station. (Yes!)

"I like rock, jazz and some country, but classical music is best for doing art," Jaskot said.

Seems like it rubbed off on them, too. When a substitute teacher put on a rock station one day the kids said they preferred classical. (Yay!)

You can read the whole story here.

Maybe supertitles would help

Posted at 12:58 PM on April 4, 2006 by Don Lee

“This music sucks,” complained a young man hanging out on Block E in downtown Minneapolis. He was talking about opera music—arias and choruses coming through the speakers outside the bar/video game parlor, Gameworks. According to the story in today’s St. Paul Pioneer Press, the music is supposed to chase away loiterers.

The strategy apparently works. For several years, stories like this one have been popping up regularly all over the country. The Associated Press reported about a month ago that Beethoven is driving drug dealers out of a park in Hartford. A musicologist quoted in that story lamented the irony that "some of the greatest composers in history are now being viewed as some kind of bug spray or disinfectant."

While I know what he means, I also must observe that one man’s bug spray is another man’s balm. You would not catch me loitering on Block E if it were Neil Diamond coming out of those speakers.