The Bleacher Bums Header

Maybe they'll get fed, maybe they'll get shocked.

Posted at 2:53 AM on May 26, 2005 by Josh Lee

The Twins made a lot of little mistakes in ten long innings on their way to a 3-2 loss to Cleveland. Pitches that rose when they should have sank. Bats that were hesitant when they needed to be swung. Outfielders that weren't sure who was calling which fly ball. Runners that just kind of stood around until they got picked off. Pitchers that let Aaron Boone get a base hit. Most of these mistakes can be rung up as little brain farts, the kind that happen to the best of us sometimes; it was just bad luck or a lack of focus that caused them all to happen on the same night. That's okay, though: the players can learn a few lessons from this game, move on, and try not to make the same mistakes tomorrow.

There's one mistake that the managing staff keeps making, though, despite continued negative reinforcement: sending J.C. Romero in to pitch with a runner on base. You'd think that the lesson would have been drilled into their heads by now, that they would have learned that if Romero inherits a runner, then that runner will almost certainly end up scoring. Unfortunately, the Twins are like the mouse that keeps hitting the wrong button and getting an electric shock instead of a food pellet, causing the people in lab coats to furrow their brows and check their notes again.

Of course, Romero's not a mouse, or a button, or whatever it is he's supposed to be in that metaphor; he's a relief pitcher, and if a relief pitcher can't be counted on to get through an inning with a runner on first, then that pitcher's got some problems. But we -- unlike Ron "The Anti-Skinnerian" Gardenhire, apparently -- don't need to be reminded that Romero's got some problems.

May 2005
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31        


Master Archive

MPR News
Radio

Listen Now

On Air

Morning Edition®

Other Radio Streams from MPR

Classical MPR
Radio Heartland

Services