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U.S. Senate: Rod Grams


SNAPSHOT
Grams floated a trial balloon about a run for Senate that went nowhere and he decided not to pursue the seat he once held. After first being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, Rod Grams gained the distinction of being the first freshman in the 103rd Congress to get legislation enacted into law: a bill to provide regulatory relief for loans for those devastated by the 1993 Midwest flood. He also pushed a $500 per child tax credit. But much of his focus during his Senate term was revamping Social Security, an issue that really didn't come into its own in Congress until President Bush proposed in 2005 what Grams was proposing in the late '90s. Grams says he was motivated to run for Senate because of the issues that have surfaced in Congress now are the issues he was trying to spearhead then.

Candidate Bio

Rod Grams
Political affiliation:
Republican Party
Born:
February 4, 1948
Princeton, MN
Personal:
Married, four children from previous marriage. Resides in Crown. Lutheran.
Occupation:
Owns three radio stations in Little Falls. Homebuilder. Was anchorman for KMSP-TV in the Twin Cities.
Education:
Carroll College, Helena, MT
Major political experience:
Grams ran and won a U.S. House seat in the 6th Congressional District. He defeated 10-year incumbent Democratic Rep. Gerry Sikorski in 1992. He was elected to the U.S. Senate, replacing the retiring Dave Durenberger in 1996.

Audio Highlights

Audio Grams announces he won't run (4/25/05)

Campaign Report

Cash on hand
$770
Current debt
$46,359

Candidate Pages

A budget-cutting package in the U.S. House would reduce funding for programs such as food stamps, Medicaid and student loans. Opponents of the bill are targeting four Minnesota Republicans, including 6th District Rep. Mark Kennedy, who's running for U.S. Senate. (11/16/2005)
Another Democrat is entering the 2006 race for U.S. Senate. Veterinarian Ford Bell formally launches his campaign Friday. On the Republican side, Vice President Dick Cheney will be in Minnesota raising money for Rep. Mark Kennedy, who's also running for Senate. (07/22/2005)
Senate candidates Mark Kennedy, Amy Klobuchar and Patty Wetterling each list assets of less than $1 million in financial disclosure forms while a fourth candidate said his assets and liabilities both exceed $50 million, according to an Associated Press review. (05/27/2005)
Citing the potential for a divisive campaign ahead, conservative former U.S. Sen. Rod Grams said Sunday he is ending his bid to return to the Senate in 2006. (04/25/2005)
Democrat Amy Klobuchar officially entered the race for U.S. Senate on Sunday. So far only Klobuchar and Republican Congressman Mark Kennedy have formally launched campaigns for the seat DFLer Mark Dayton will leave at the end of next year. (04/17/2005)
Another Republican Party heavy hitter, Gov. Tim Pawlenty, endorsed U.S. Rep. Mark Kennedy's 2006 campaign Monday as the congressman's lone GOP rival lashed out at party bosses he said were counting him out too soon. (03/07/2005)
Sixth District Rep. Mark Kennedy, R-Minn., has already begun campaigning for U.S. Senate even though Minnesotans won't vote for nearly two years. Democrats say Kennedy is shirking his House of Representatives duties in favor of his Senate bid. (02/25/2005)
U.S. Rep. Mark Kennedy is the first candidate to officially jump into the U.S. Senate race. Kennedy, a Republican, announced Friday that he will run for the seat being vacated by DFLer Mark Dayton. (02/11/2005)
Sen. Mark Dayton's decision to bow out after one term touched off a flurry of talk Wednesday about Democrats who might try to move up the political ladder. (02/09/2005)
Republican Rod Grams is pondering a political comeback with a possible challenge to Democratic Sen. Mark Dayton, who knocked him out of office in 2000. (02/02/2005)