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Gutkencht confident of eighth term
For more than a decade, Republican Gil Gutknecht has represented the 1st District in the U.S. House of Representatives. He's won his last few races handily. This year's election is unlikely to be any different. In fact Gutknecht is so confident he's barely campaigning at all.
Decided voters make their cases
In the presidential election, a great deal has been made of the undecided voters--the relatively tiny portion of the electorate that still hasn't made up its mind about which candidate to support. But what about all those voters who already have made their choice? We invite a group of of Bush and Kerry supporters to make their best cases for the candidate they are backing.
The presidential candidates on the issues
Still not sure exactly where presidential candidates George W. Bush and John Kerry stand on foreign policy, the economy, health care, education and social issues? Minnesota Public Radio has produced a series of special reports that go beyond the stump speeches and look at the actual policies Bush and Kerry are proposing.
Weighing the value of candidate visits
President Bush is due back in Minnesota Saturday. Both the president and Sen. John Kerry have been frequent visitors to Minnesota throughout the presidential campaign. Political scientists say with the election just days away visits by the candidate can boost standings in the polls. They also say the campaign rallies go a long way toward bolstering voter turnout.
KSTP video sheds light on when Iraqi explosives went missing
A news crew with Twin Cities TV station KSTP shot video of U.S. troops in Iraq in April of 2003 that may help determine when tons of powerful explosives were removed from the Al-QaQaa munitions base. Earlier this week, the New York Times reported that almost 380 tons of explosives from the site were not secured immediately after the invasion of Iraq. Reporter Dean Staley, who now works in Seattle, and photo journalist Joe Caffrey were embedded with the 101st Airborne Division at the time. Morning Edition host Cathy Wurzer spoke with Caffrey, who says he shot the video nine days after the fall of Baghdad.
RV vote could affect South Dakota senate race
Several thousand people with only slim ties to South Dakota could affect the state's U.S. Senate contest. They are people who live and travel most of the year in recreational vehicles.
Meet the Candidates: Mark Kennedy and Patty Wetterling
The congressional race in Minnesota's 6th District has been one of the most closely watched in the country. In what would otherwise be a relatively safe reelection campaign, Republican Mark Kennedy is facing a challenge from a very well-known first-time candidate: missing children's advocate Patty Wetterling. Minnesota Public Radio's Meet the Candidates series continues with back-to-back interviews with Kennedy and Wetterling.
Edwards says Bush didn't do his job in Iraq
Sen. John Edwards campaigned in Duluth Thursday, blaming President Bush for a missing cache of explosives in Iraq. Edwards said that "our men and women in uniform did their job, George Bush didn't do his job." Vice President Dick Cheney makes a campaign stop in International Falls Thursday afternoon.
Speechless no more, Ventura stumps for Kerry at colleges
Former Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura is silent no more on why he's supporting Sen. John Kerry for president. Unleashing a strong attack against President Bush, Ventura appeared at Century College, a community and technical college in White Bear Lake, to encourage young people to vote.
Polling the Midwestern battleground
Just when everyone thought the presidential election couldn't get any tighter, it has. Recent polls have put states like Arkansas (once thought safe for Bush) and Hawaii (where Kerry was believed to be a shoo-in) onto the list of swing states. Then there's our little corner of the upper Midwest--Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa--which is every bit as close as it has been for most of the election. Most presidential elections with an incumbent candidate tend to be more like landslides than photo finishes. Could this one be the exception?
Campaign roundup: Bush, Kerry exchange long-distance jabs, race through Midwest
In a stinging exchange, President Bush criticized Democratic challenger John Kerry as "the wrong man for the wrong job at the wrong time" on Thursday while the Massachusetts senator accused his rival of constantly ducking responsibility for his own actions. For the fourth consecutive day, Kerry assailed Bush over the disclosure that nearly 400 tons of explosives were missing in Iraq.
Parties step up their poll monitoring efforts
Thousands of new voters are expected at their local precincts next Tuesday -- but they won't be the only newcomers at the polls. Hundreds of lawyers, poll watchers, and activists will be on hand, alert for any irregularities or signs of mischief. Minnesota has a reputation for clean elections, but the legacy of the 2000 presidential election has put unprecedented scrutiny on this year's balloting.
Friction over political signs
In Duluth, three teenagers have been charged with a felony for defacing political signs. Election fever is so high, campaign workers around the state say people are stealing and defacing lawn signs more than usual. Some people complain, civility seems to be suffering during this election season.
Outside money sets tone of the U.S. Senate race in South Dakota
More money is being spent in South Dakota's race for the U.S. Senate this year than ever before. TV shows and newspapers are filled with political ads. Democratic incumbent Sen. Tom Daschle has not had any outside advertising run on behalf. Until this week, all of his ads came from his campaign. Republican challenger John Thune has gotten help from the national Republican Party -- $1 million worth so far has been spent on ads critical of Tom Daschle.
1st District and 5th District debates
Minnesota Public Radio's Meet the Candidates series continues with the congressional candidates in the 1st and 5th Districts.

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